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300,000 applications as Cape Breton marketplace offers ‘land for jobs’

  • January 28, 2018

Heather Coulombe says it was some-more of an act of recklessness than a crafty selling ploy to offer land to pursuit applicants.

In a tumble of 2016, a co-owner of a Farmer’s Daughter Country Market in Whycocomagh, Cape Breton, couldn’t figure out how she would keep her business operating.

The Farmer's Daughter Market employs 100 people

The Farmer’s Daughter Market is a bustling stop on a Trans-Canada Highway that employs 100 people.

With roughly the entire staff of university students formulation to lapse to class, Coulombe and her sister suspicion they competence have to tighten down their year-round business.

“We started putting ads adult on Service Canada and things like that, and we weren’t removing anyone local, we were removing people from overseas,” pronounced Coulombe.

“We looked into doing immigration and stuff, though that was going to take too long. So we indeed put ads on Kijiji right opposite a country, though we didn’t get anyone there either,” she said.

The Farmer's Daughter Market

It’s been tough for a Farmer’s Daughter Market to find workers in Whycocomagh, that has a race of usually 400 people. (Wendy Martin)

The Farmer’s Daughter Country marketplace is on a Trans-Canada Highway, about an hour from a Marine Atlantic packet depot in North Sydney and half an hour from a Canso Causeway that separates the Nova Scotia mainland from Cape Breton.

It’s tough to find year-round workers in Cape Breton, generally for lower-paying jobs. There are usually 400 people living in Whycocomagh, with another 600 in a adjacent First Nations village of Waycobah. 

‘She said, ‘We’re going to give them a land for free.’  And I only arrange of stood there, and was really really quiet.’
- Heather Coulombe

One day, Coloumbe’s sister, Sandee Maclean, went for a travel on Campbell’s Mountain unaware a Bras d’Or Lake.

While admiring a view, she came adult with an surprising resolution to a market’s challenge of attracting and maintaining workers, and rushed behind to tell Heather about it. 

“She said, ‘We’re going to give them a land for free.’ we only arrange of stood there, and was really really quiet. And she goes, ‘Are we going to contend anything?’ we said, ‘I’m digesting this, I’m meditative about it.’  And afterwards we said, ‘It could work.'”

Lina Roxas

Lina Roxas took a pursuit during a Farmer’s Daughter and feels during home in Whycocomagh. (Wendy Martin)

The sisters posted their interest in Aug 2016 on a Farmer’s Daughter Market’s Facebook page.

Their summary distinguished what creates life in Cape Breton so special as good as charity to give divided parcels of a family land and a job, to anyone peaceful to pierce to a community.

“One thing a business does have is lots of land. If we confirm this event competence fit your dreams and goals for a tighten to inlet and community-focused life, we are peaceful to offer we dual acres of wooded land where we can immediately set adult your little residence or old-fashioned cabin,” Heather Coulombe said.

“If you’re still operative for us in 5 years, and we still like any other after that time, a land is yours for a cost of migrating it and putting it in your name.”

Within a week, they had perceived 4,000 applications. Right now their inbox has over 300,000 offers from around a world.

The Coulombe sisters might have stumbled on a resolution to farming Canada’s immigration problem. The implausible response to their land-for-jobs offer has held a courtesy of municipal, provincial and sovereign levels of government.

Here’s Wendy Martin’s Atlantic Voice documentary. 

Article source: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/atlantic-voice-farmer-s-daughter-cape-breton-immigration-1.4501746?cmp=rss

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