Share

Jussie Smollett fallout: Police union, activists hold dueling protests over Kim Foxx conduct

CLOSE

Dueling rallies developed in Chicago between supporters and detractors of Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Foxx’s performance in the Jussie Smollett case.
AP, AP

CHICAGO – The city’s police union and a coalition of civil rights activists held competing demonstrations Monday in downtown Chicago to express their divergent opinions on Cook County State’s Attorney Kim Foxx handling of the criminal case against “Empire” actor Jussie Smollett.

Police said Smollett, 36, who is gay and black, reported an attack on Jan. 29 near his apartment in the city’s swanky Streeterville neighborhood that was intended to make him look like the victim of a brutal hate crime. The incident spurred the department to spend about $130,000 in overtime as police hunted for the perpetrators of the alleged attack.

Hundreds of backers of the Chicago Fraternal Order of Police gathered outside Foxx’s office, which has faced criticism from law enforcement, national and Illinois prosecutor groups, Mayor Rahm Emanuel and other politicians over the Smollett case.

The pro-police demonstrators – some wearing President Trump’s Make America Great Again hats – chanted “Kim Foxx must go,” and “Back the blue,” while holding homemade signs with messages eviscerating the state’s attorney. 

“This is about making sure people are treated fairly,” said Kevin Graham, president of the Fraternal Order of Police. “We cannot forgot about victims. There has to be a deterrent if you’re going to have laws and we’re going to arrest people. If there is no deterrent, what are we doing?”

Meanwhile, members of Jesse Jackson’s Rainbow/PUSH Coalition and other civil-rights activists stood by supporting Foxx. Jackson said Foxx has become the victim of “unreasonable, unjustified and politically motivated” criticism.

Foxx said she recused herself from the Smollett investigation before and tapped her first deputy, Joseph Magats, to oversee the case. 

Foxx said that she ceded control of the case to her deputy because she had traded text and email message with Tina Tchen, a prominent attorney and former Michelle Obama chief of staff, and an unnamed Smollett relative before the actor was charged.

Weeks after the alleged attack, police announced that they had charged Smollett with disorderly conduct for filing a false police report. They alleged that Smollett paid two brothers he worked with on the set of “Empire” to help him stage the incident.

Foxx’s office announced last week that prosecutors had reached a deal with Smollett in which they agreed to drop the charges, and the actor agreed to forfeit $10,000 he put up for bond to secure his release following his February arrest.

Smollett has maintained his innocence, and his attorneys say the prosecutor’s office has “flip-flopped” on details of the arrangement.

Post to Facebook

Posted!

A link has been posted to your Facebook feed.

  • Former mayoral candidate and community activist Ja'Mal Green, right, verbally spars with Fraternal Order of Police supporters protesting against Cook County State's Attorney Kim Foxx outside the county administration building on April 1, 2019. Dueling rallies in downtown Chicago supported and criticized Foxx's performance in the Jussie Smollett case. 1 of 14
  • Protestors organized by the Fraternal Order of Police call for the removal of Cook County State's Attorney Kim Foxx on April 1, 2019 in Chicago.2 of 14
  • Protestors organized by the Fraternal Order of Police call for the removal of Cook County State's Attorney Kim Foxx on April 1, 2019 in Chicago.3 of 14
  • Protestors organized by the Fraternal Order of Police call for the removal of Cook County State's Attorney Kim Foxx on April 1, 2019 in Chicago.4 of 14
  • Rev. Jesse Jackson and Father Michel Pfleger embrace after voicing their support for Cook County State's Attorney Kim Foxx before the start of a protest organized by the Fraternal Order of Police calling for the removal of Foxx on April 1, 2019 in Chicago.5 of 14
  • Supporters of Cook County State's Attorney Kim Foxx argue with protestors during a demonstration organized by the Fraternal Order of Police to call for Foxx's removal on April 01, 2019 in Chicago.6 of 14
  • A supporter of Cook County State's Attorney Kim Foxx, right, argues with a protestor during a demonstration organized by the Fraternal Order of Police to call for Foxx's removal on April 1, 2019 in Chicago.7 of 14
  • A protestor argues with a supporter of Cook County State's Attorney Kim Foxx, left, during a demonstration organized by the Fraternal Order of Police to call for Foxx's removal on April 1, 2019 in Chicago.8 of 14
  • Protestors argue with supporters of Cook County State's Attorney Kim Foxx during a demonstration organized by the Fraternal Order of Police to call for Foxx's removal on April 1, 2019 in Chicago.9 of 14
  • Protestors protest Cook County State's Attorney Kim Foxx's office's decision to drop all charges against Empire actor Jussie Smollett on April 1, 2019, in Chicago.10 of 14
  • Members of the Fraternal Order of Police and supporters of the group clash with a protester while demonstrating against Cook County State's Attorney Kim Foxx outside the county administration building on April 1, 2019 in Chicago. 11 of 14
  • Rev. Jesse Jackson, second from left, watches as Fraternal Order of Police President Kevin Graham speaks to reporters during a protest against Cook County State's Attorney Kim Foxx outside the county administration building on April 1, 2019 in Chicago.12 of 14
  • Dueling protestors clash over Cook County State's Attorney Kim Foxx's office's decision to drop all charges against Empire actor Jussie Smollett on April 1, 2019, in Chicago. 13 of 14
  • Members of the Fraternal Order of Police and supporters of the group protest against Cook County State's Attorney Kim Foxx outside the county administration building on April 1, 2019 in Chicago.14 of 14

Ja’Mal Green, a Chicago activist who has spoken against police brutality, questioned why some Chicagoans who were expressing outrage over the Smollett case have been silent about the police department’s checkered history.

The city has paid out more than $700 million in settlements and legal fees since 2010 for police misconduct. In October, a white police officer, Jason Van Dyke, was convicted of second-degree murder and 16 counts of aggravated battery for the shooting death of Laquan McDonald, a black teen whose 2014 death spurred street protests and a Justice Department investigation of the police department’s practices.

Foxx defeated former State’s Attorney Anita Alvarez in 2016’s Democratic primary after hammering her for her handling of the McDonald case.

Van Dyke wasn’t charged until 400 days after the shooting – the same day that the city was forced to release chilling police dash cam video that showed Van Dyke fire 16 shots at  McDonald as the teen was moving away from police officers who were trying to apprehend him.

“Where were these people, who are out on the street now, demanding justice for a young black boy?” Green said. “This is not just an attack on Kim Foxx. This is an attack on black-elected officials throughout this state.”

Graham, the president of the Chicago police union, announced after the charges that he would ask for a Justice Department investigation of the handling of the case.

Trump also said that he would enlist the Justice Department and FBI to review the incident.

Over the weekend, Foxx offered her most extensive comments to date in a Chicago Tribune op-ed about her office’s decision to offer Smollett a rather lenient sentence.

Trust: Smollett, Mueller and the news cycle that put another nail in the coffin of trust

‘Saturday Night Live’: ‘SNL’ mocks Jussie Smollett in sketch that doubts his innocence. Did it go too far?

What happened: Jussie Smollett: How did prosecutors go from indictment to wrist slap?

“First, falsely reporting a hate crime is a dangerous and unlawful act, and Smollett was not exonerated of that in this case,” Foxx wrote in the Tribune op-ed. “Second, our criminal justice system is at its best when jails are used to protect us from the people we rightly fear, while alternative outcomes are reserved for the people who make us angry but need to learn the error of their ways without seeing their lives irrevocably destroyed.”

Jackson said the union was demonstrating misplaced anger by protesting Foxx, who is up for re-election in less than a year.

“We appeal to the FOP not to polarize the city,” Jackson said. “Kim Foxx is a force for good and an agent of change.”

Betty Underwood, 61, a protester who expressed her displeasure with Foxx, said this one wasn’t a close call.

“It’s so egregious that you can turn away from it,” said Underwood, who lives in the Chicago neighborhood where Smollett reported he was attacked. “There are so many young that have marks on their record for doing something wrong or stupid. But their lives are ruined, because they are not Jussie Smollett and don’t have someone who can call Kim Foxx.”

Post to Facebook

Posted!

A link has been posted to your Facebook feed.

  • Actor Jussie Smollett smiles and waves to supporters before leaving Cook County Court after his charges were dropped Tuesday, March 26, 2019, in Chicago.1 of 28
  • Actor Jussie Smollett leaves Cook County Court after his charges were dropped Tuesday, March 26, 2019, in Chicago. (AP Photo/Paul Beaty) ORG XMIT: ILPB1322 of 28
  • In this image taken from video, Chicago Mayor Rahm Emanuel, right, and Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson appear at a news conference in Chicago, Tuesday, March 26, 2019, after prosecutors abruptly dropped all charges against Empire actor Jussie Smollett, abandoning the case barely five weeks after he was accused of lying to police about being the target of a racist, anti-gay attack in downtown Chicago. The mayor and police chief blasted the decision and stood by the investigation that concluded Smollett staged a hoax. (Mitch Armentrout/Chicago Sun-Times via AP) ORG XMIT: ILCHS4033 of 28
  • Actor Jussie Smollett takes a selfie with a fan outside the Leighton Criminal Courthouse in Chicago on Tuesday, March 26, 2019, after prosecutors dropped all charges against him. Smollett was indicted on 16 felony counts related to making a false report that he was attacked by two men who shouted racial and homophobic slurs. 4 of 28
  • Actor Jussie Smollett speaks with members of the media after his court appearance at Leighton Courthouse on March 26, 2019 in Chicago, Ill. This morning in court it was announced that all charges were dropped against the actor. 5 of 28
  • Actor Jussie Smollett leaves the Leighton Criminal Courthouse in Chicago on Tuesday, March 26, 2019, after prosecutors dropped all charges against him.6 of 28
  • Empire actor Jussie Smollett, center, arrives at Chicago's Leighton Criminal Court Building for his arraignment hearing on Thursday, March 14, 2019.7 of 28
  • On Feb. 22, Fox announced it was suspending Smollett, one day after the actor's arrest. His character, Jamal Lyon, will be cut out of the final two episodes of Season 5. The show returns from its winter break on March 13.8 of 28
  • Jussie Smollett is seen during the Season 5 fall finale of Empire. Will he be back for the second half following his arrest for filing a false police report saying he was assaulted?9 of 28
  • Jussie Smollett: The Empire star surrendered to Chicago10 of 28
  • Cook County Judge John Fitzgerald Lyke Jr. addresses Smollett in a courtroom sketch from his bond hearing on Feb. 21. Lyke said he was taken aback by the accusations even as he told the actor he has the presumption of innocence. The most vile and despicable part of it, if its true, is the noose, said Lyke, who, like Smollett, is black. That symbol conjures up such evil in this countrys history.11 of 28
  • Assistant State's Attorney Risa Lanier briefs reporters after Smollett's bond hearing. Prosecutors say he paid two brothers, Abimbola Abel and Olabinjo Ola Osundairo, to stage the assault and stage-managed the whole thing, choosing the location and telling them to put a rope around his heck, pour bleach on him and yell, This is MAGA country!12 of 28
  • Jussie Smollett leaves Cook County jail after posting bail on Feb. 21.  The judge set his bond at $100,000 required the actor to surrender his passport and forbade him from having any contact with the Osundairo brothers.13 of 28
  • Smollett was reportedly expected back on the set of Empire hours after leaving the Cook County jail.14 of 28
  • In a press conference following his arrest, Chicago Police Superintendent Eddie Johnson said, First Smollett attempted to gain attention by sending a false letter that relied on racial homophobic and political language. When that didnt work, Smollett paid $3,500 to stage this attack. The stunt was orchestrated by Smollett because he was dissatisfied with his salary so he concocted a story about being attacked.15 of 28
  • On Feb. 22, less than 10 days after interviewing Smollett on Good Morning America, Robin Roberts called his arrest a setback for race relations, homophobia, MAGA supporters  the fingers were pointed at them. I cannot think of another case where there's this anger on so many sides, and you can understand why there would be.16 of 28
  • Smollett referenced his attack during a Feb. 2 concert in Los Angeles, less than a week later. He told the crowd, I had to be here tonight, y'all. I couldn't let those (expletives) win.17 of 28
  • Smollett laughs with co-star Taraji P. Henson during a scene from Season 5.  The actress, who plays his mother, expressed support for him the day after the alleged assault in an Instagram post, writing, I wish what happened to my baby was just one big bad joke but it wasnt and we all feel his pain right now.18 of 28
  • Actor-singer Jussie Smollett, from the Fox series, Empire, March 6, 2018, in New York.19 of 28
  • Jussie Smollett speaks during the Empire season 5 world premiere during the 2018 Tribeca TV Festival at in New York City.20 of 28
  • Jussie Smollett and Serayah McNeill perform onstage during amfAR Dance2Cure Dec. 1, 2018 in Hollywood.21 of 28
  • David Christopher, Deborah Cox, and Jussie Smollett attend the Trevor Project's TrevorLIVE LA 2018,  Dec. 3, 2018 in Beverly Hills.22 of 28
  • Jussie Smollett, Billy Porter, and Deborah Cox attend the Trevor Project's TrevorLIVE LA 2018 at The Beverly Hilton Hotel, Dec. 3, 2018 in Beverly Hills.23 of 28
  • Actor Jussie Smollett, a 2019 inductee of the 5000 Role Models of Excellence Project, left, Congresswoman Frederica S. Wilson and Danny Glover who was also a 2019 inductee pose for photos during the ceremony at The Miami Beach Convention Center on Monday, Jan. 21, 2019, in Miami Beach, Fla. (Jose A. Iglesias/Miami Herald via AP) ORG XMIT: FLMIH10424 of 28
  • Lucious (Terrence Howard) toasts his family in the Devil Quotes Scripture television episode. L-R: Jussie Smollett, Serayah McNeill, Taraji P. Henson, Bryshere Gray, Grace Gealey, Terrence Howard, Trai Byers and Kaitlin Doubleday.25 of 28
  • First lady Michelle Obama moves out of the way as she welcomes performer Jussie Smollett, in the State Dinning Room of the White House in Washington, Feb. 24, 2016, during an interactive student workshop on the musical legacy of Ray Charles, where students from 10 schools and community organizations from across the country participate as part of the In Performance at the White House series.26 of 28
  • Jussie Smollett speaks during the Empire season 5 world premiere during the 2018 Tribeca TV Festival in New York City, Sept. 22, 201827 of 28
  • I am working with authorities and have been 100% factual and consistent on every level, Jussie Smollett said Friday in his first statement since the attack.28 of 28

 

Article source: https://feeds.feedblitz.com/~/600209178/0/usatoday-lifetopstories~Jussie-Smollett-fallout-Police-union-activists-hold-dueling-protests-over-Kim-Foxx-conduct/

Loading...

Best Wordpress Plugin development company in India     Best Web development company in India