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New York Senator Kirsten Gillibrand addressed hundreds of African-Americans at a MLK celebration hosted by civil rights activist Al Sharpton in New York City. Gillibrand said “white women like me” must be a part of the fight against racism. (Jan. 21)
AP

New York Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand made official what already was well-known on Sunday by formally joining the crowded Democratic field of candidates for president in 2020.

Gillibrand, 52, made the announcement on Twitter and released a two-and-a-half- minute campaign video entitled “The Brave”  in which she discusses The Star-Spangled Banner and urges Americans to “be brave” and support her and her policies.

Gillibrand talks about universal health care, family leave, an end to gun violence, the Green New Deal and campaign finance changes.

“I’m running for president,” she tweeted. “Let’s prove that brave wins.”

Gillibrand, one of six women now in the Democratic field, launched an exploratory campaign in January. Recent polling of the field shows her garnering 1 percent or less of the vote – an important number because under party rules she must claim 1 percent or more to qualify for primary debates.

“We’re building a campaign that will change who’s at the decision-making table, take on powerful interests and restore moral integrity to the White House,” Gillibrand said. “And we won’t take a cent from corporate PACs or federal lobbyists.”

Gillibrand will conduct an MSNBC town hall Monday in Michigan. Then she is off to Iowa for two days before heading to Nevada. She plans on making her first major speech as a candidate next Sunday in New York – “straight to President Trump’s doorstep” in front of Trump International.

Gillibrand also has made sexual harassment and abuse in the military, colleges and the workplace a top priority, has provided a strong voice for the #MeToo movement and was among the first Democrats to call for the resignation of Minnesota Democrat Al Franken amid claims he improperly touched women.

But Gillibrand’s biggest publicity splash as a would-be candidate was controversy that flared up last week over how she handled a sexual harassment complaint in her office last year.

In July, a former female aide made complaints against a senior male staffer in Gillibrand’s Washington office. A few weeks later the aide resigned claiming the complaint was poorly handled.

She said the allegations were investigated in consultation with the Senate employment counsel. The investigation found that the behavior, although inappropriate, did not meet the standard for sexual harassment, she said.

Additional complaints came to light, however, and the staffer was later dismissed.

Contributing: Peter D. Kramer, Rockland/Westchester Journal News

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Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., left, and Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., right, listen to testimony during the Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 25, 2018, on global challenges and U.S. national security strategy. The witnesses were former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, former Secretary of State George Shultz and former Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage. Susan Walsh, APThe New York delegation cast their votes during roll call along with (Center L-R) New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio, Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY), Rep. Charles Rangel (D-NY), New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, and Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), on the second day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 26, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25. Joe Raedle, Getty ImagesSenate subcommittee on Personnel Chair, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., right, talks with former US Army Sgt. Rebekah Havrilla, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 13, 2013, after Havrilla testified before the subcommittee’s hearing on sexual assault in the military. Havrilla told the committee that she encountered a “broken” military criminal justice system after she was raped by another service member while serving in Afghanistan. Havrilla described suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and described how her case was eventually closed after senior commanders decided not to pursue charges. Carolyn Kaster, AP

  • Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) participates in a mock swearing in ceremony with Vice President Mike Pence on Capitol Hill on Jan. 3, 2019 in Washington, DC. 1 of 19
  • Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), center, talks with Rep. Adriano Espaillat (D-NY) and Rep. Yvette Clarke (D-NY) during a post-midterm election meeting of Rev. Al Sharpton's National Action Network in the Kennedy Caucus Room at the Russell Senate Office Building on Capitol Hill Nov. 14, 2018 in Washington, DC. Politicians believed to be considering a run for the 2020 Democratic party nomination, including Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA) and Sen. Kamala Harris (D-CA), addressed the network meeting as well as House members vying for leadership positions.=2 of 19
  • Senator Kamala Harris (D-CA) speaking along with Senator Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), right, Senator Richard Blumenthal (D-Connecticut), and Senator Mazie Hirono (D-Hawaii) to protesters gathered at the United States Supreme Court ahead of a Senate Judiciary Committee vote on Brett Kavanaugh for Associate Justice of the Supreme Court on Sept. 28, 2018 in Washington.  3 of 19
  • Senator Kirsten Gillibrand, D-NY, delivers address to the Center for American Progress (CAP) during the annual ideas conference in Washington.4 of 19
  • Sen. Jeanne Shaheen, D-N.H., left, and Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., right, listen to testimony during the Senate Armed Services Committee hearing on Capitol Hill in Washington, Thursday, Jan. 25, 2018, on global challenges and U.S. national security strategy. The witnesses were former Secretary of State Henry Kissinger, former Secretary of State George Shultz and former Deputy Secretary of State Richard Armitage.5 of 19
  • Sen. Gillibrand poses for a portrait on March 9, 2017.6 of 19
  • Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-NY, left, speaks alongside Mazie Hirono, D-HI, during the 2016 Democratic National Convention at Wells Fargo Center. 7 of 19
  • The New York delegation cast their votes during roll call along with (Center L-R) New York City Mayor Bill De Blasio, Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY), Rep. Charles Rangel (D-NY), New York Gov. Andrew Cuomo, and Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY), on the second day of the Democratic National Convention at the Wells Fargo Center, July 26, 2016 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania. An estimated 50,000 people are expected in Philadelphia, including hundreds of protesters and members of the media. The four-day Democratic National Convention kicked off July 25. 8 of 19
  • Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-NY, speaks during the 2016 Democratic National Convention at Wells Fargo Arena on July 25, 2016. 9 of 19
  • Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-NY, walks to the stage before speaking during the 2016 Democratic National Convention at Wells Fargo Arena on July 25, 2016. 10 of 19
  • Calling it her proudest day in Congress, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) (2nd L) embraces FealGood Foundation co-founder John Feal during a news conference with Sen. Chuck Schumer (D-NY) (R) after the Zadroga 9/11 health and compensation programs were included in the omnibus spending bill that passed Congress at the U.S. Capitol on Dec. 18, 2015 in Washington, DC. With a public awareness campaign lead by former Daily Show host Jon Stewart, the Zadroga legislation will provide money for healthcare for first responders and others suffering from diseases from the 9/11 attacks and for the families of those who have died.11 of 19
  • Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y. poses for a photo on April 2, 2014.12 of 19
  • (L-R) Sen. Elizabeth Warren (D-MA), Sen. Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) and other women Democratic sentaors hold a news conference to announce their support for raising the minimum wage to $10.10 at the U.S. Capitol Jan. 30, 2014 in Washington, DC. Thirteen of the 16 Democratic women senators were at the news conference.13 of 19
  • Senate subcommittee on Personnel Chair, Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., right, talks with former US Army Sgt. Rebekah Havrilla, on Capitol Hill in Washington, Wednesday, March 13, 2013, after Havrilla testified before the subcommittee's hearing on sexual assault in the military. Havrilla told the committee that she encountered a broken military criminal justice system after she was raped by another service member while serving in Afghanistan. Havrilla described suffering from post-traumatic stress disorder and described how her case was eventually closed after senior commanders decided not to pursue charges. 14 of 19
  • U.S. Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand (D-NY) holds her son Henry, 4, after greeting supporters at New York State Democratic Headquarters after she was predicted to win her election against Republican Wendy Long, Tuesday, Nov. 6, 2012, in New York.15 of 19
  • In this May 18, 2009 file photo, first lady Michelle Obama, right, is joined by Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y. during the ribbon cutting ceremony officially reopening the Charles Engelhard Court of the newly renovated American Wing at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York.16 of 19
  • Sen Charles Schumer, left, and Sen. Kirsten Gillibrand, right, introduce Supreme Court nominee Sonia Sotomayor to the Senate Judiciary  committee on the first day of her confirmation hearings , July 13th, 2009. USA TODAY photo by Robert Deutsch17 of 19
  • House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, left,  performs ceremonial swearing-in of Rep. Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., at the Capitol in Washington, on Thursday, Jan. 4, 2007. With her are her husband Jonathan and their son, Theodore. Members of the House were sworn in on the House floor earlier in the day. 18 of 19
  • Rep.-elect Kirsten Gillibrand, D-N.Y., stands near the Capitol in Washington on Wednesday, Nov. 15, 2006. 19 of 19

 

 

 

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