Trump says asylum seekers will wait in Mexico, won't be allowed in U.S. until courts approve

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Migrants in a caravan of Central Americans have arrived by the hundreds in Tijuana, just south of San Diego. Many say they will seek asylum in the US. (Nov. 15)
AP

WASHINGTON – President Donald Trump announced over Twitter Saturday evening that asylum seekers at the Southern border will wait in Mexico while their claims are processed in U.S. courts.

“Migrants at the Southern Border will not be allowed into the United States until their claims are individually approved in court. We only will allow those who come into our Country legally,” the president wrote on Twitter Saturday evening. “All will stay in Mexico.”

In his tweets, the president also threatened to close the Southern border “for any reason it becomes necessary.” 

“There is no way that the United States will, after decades of abuse, put up with this costly and dangerous situation anymore!” Trump wrote. 

The president’s tweets followed a Washington Post report Saturday that described a new agreement between the U.S. and Mexico that would allow asylum seekers to stay in Mexico. 

The Post, which quoted Mexican officials and senior members of President-elect Andrés Manuel López Obrador’s transition team, reported the agreement would break with long-standing asylum rules and place a “formidable new barrier” for migrants from Central America attempting to reach the United States.

The Post said the plan was dubbed “Remain in Mexico.”

More: Homeland Security focuses on border security — not processing asylum applications from migrant caravan

More: Homeland Security focuses on border security — not processing asylum applications from migrant caravan

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Thousands of migrants, fleeing violence and poverty, have gathered at the Mexican border city of Tijuana. They are among several hundred other asylum-seekers heading north in groups toward the United States.

The Post reported that no formal agreement on the issue has been signed, and many details remain unresolved. López Obrador takes office Dec. 1.

Before the U.S. midterm elections, Trump called the northward movement of migrants in caravans an “invasion” and ordered several thousand U.S. troops to the border to bolster border security.

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Residents stand on a hill before barriers, wrapped in concertina wire, separating Mexico and the United States, where the border meets the Pacific Ocean, in Tijuana, Mexico, Saturday, Nov. 17, 2018. Many of the nearly 3,000 migrants have reached the border with California. The mayor has called the migrants’ arrival an “avalanche” that the city is ill-prepared to handle. Marco Ugarte, APSairy Hueso, part of the Central American migrant caravan, carries her daughter Etzabe Ponce, as she stands next to her husband while waiting in line to receive a number as part of the process to apply for asylum in the United States, at the border in Tijuana, Mexico Tijuana, Mexico, Friday, Nov. 16, 2018. Rodrigo Abd, APMembers of the caravan of Central American migrants prepare to leave Mexico City, Mexico, and resume their journey to the United States on Nov. 10, 2018. After failing to get the UN to provide free transportation, thousands of migrants from the caravan of Central Americans camped in Mexico City agreed to prepare to leave the capital on Saturday and resume their march on foot to the United States. Groups of migrants, mostly young, did not comply with this decision and left early in the morning for Queretaro, north of the capital, although most of the approximately 5,000 people in the caravan remained in the camp, following the indications of Pueblo Sin Fronteras, the organization that accompanies them. Sashenka Gutierrez, EPA-EFEHundreds of members of the Central American migrant caravan move in the early hours toward their next destination on Nov. 04, 2018, in Isla, Mexico. The group of migrants, many of them fleeing violence in their home countries, last took a rest day on Wednesday and have resumed their march to the United States border. As fatigue from the heat, distance and poor sanitary conditions has set in, the number of people participating in the march has slowly dwindled, but a significant group are still determined to get to the United Sates. The U.S. will deploy more than 5,000 active-duty troops to the U.S.-Mexico border in an effort to prevent members of the migrant caravan from illegally entering the country. Spencer Platt, Getty ImagesCentral American migrants, part of the caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, get a ride on a truck in Donaji, Oaxaca state, Mexico, Friday, Nov. 2, 2018. The migrants had already made a grueling 40-mile trek from Juchitan, Oaxaca, on Thursday, after they failed to get the bus transportation they had hoped for. But hitching rides allowed them to get to Donaji early, and some headed on to a town even further north, Sayula. Rodrigo Abd, APErnesto Martinez, 27, and his wife Yesenia, 23, are traveling with their three daughters, including a baby who was just 17-days-old when they joined the caravan on Oct. 20. The family is from San Martin, Retalhuleu, Guatemala. They have pushed the baby in a stroller more than 180 miles crossing through the state of Chiapas, before reaching the state of Oaxaca on Oct. 27, 2018. Nick Oza, Arizona Republic, via USA TODAY NetworkCentral American migrant Cristian pushes a carriage occupied by his daughters; Karen, 5, left, and Beiyi, 4, as they make their way to Mapastepec, Mexico, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018, in a caravan headed to the U.S. Rodrigo Abd, APMarvin Sanabria, a Central American migrant traveling with a caravan to the U.S., kneels in prayer after waking up, in Huixtla, Mexico, Tuesday. The caravan, estimated to include more than 7,000 people, had advanced but still faced more than 1,000 miles, and likely much further, to the end of the journey. Moises Castillo/APHonduran migrants, who were taking part in a caravan heading to the US, board a bus to return to Honduras, in Ciudad Tecun Uman, Guatemala, on Oct. 20, 2018. Some 220 Honduran migrants were returning to their country and some 130 were waiting at a shelter Saturday, according to a police source, while thousands who forced their way through Guatemala’s northwestern border and flooded onto a bridge leading to Mexico, were waiting at the border in the hope of continuing their journey. Johan Ordonez, AFP/Getty Images

  • Members of the 'migrant caravan' wait in line to receive breakfast outside a temporary shelter set up for members of the caravan on November 24, 2018 in Tijuana, Mexico. Around 6,000 migrants from Central America have arrived in the city with the mayor of Tijuana declaring the situation a 'humanitarian crisis'. Most migrants in the caravan say they plan to petition for asylum in the U.S. The incoming government in Mexico will reportedly support a new Trump administration policy requiring migrants asking for asylum in the U.S. to remain in Mexico while their cases are processed.  1 of 300
  • Bodyboarders walk next to the U.S.-Mexico border structure in Tijuana, Mexico, Friday, Nov. 23, 2018. The mayor of Tijuana has declared a humanitarian crisis in his border city and says that he has asked the United Nations for aid to deal with the approximately 5,000 Central American migrants who have arrived in the city.32 of 300
  • A man paints a sign with the U.S. flag outside a migrant shelter in Tijuana, Mexico, Friday, Nov. 23, 2018. 3 of 300
  • People peer through the U.S.-Mexico border fence, towards San Diego, at the Pacific Ocean, on Nov. 23, 2018 in Tijuana, Mexico. 4 of 300
  • A banner painted by migrants in the colors of the U.S. flag is displayed outside a temporary shelter set up for members of the 'migrant caravan' at a soccer complex on Nov. 23, 2018 in Tijuana, Mexico. 5 of 300
  • Members of the 'migrant caravan' worship during a street worship service outside a temporary shelter set up for members of the caravan on Nov. 23, 2018 in Tijuana, Mexico. 6 of 300
  • Members of the 'migrant caravan' worship, reflected in a car window, during a street worship service outside a temporary shelter set up for members of the caravan on Nov. 23, 2018 in Tijuana, Mexico. Around 5,000 migrants from Central America have arrived in the city with the mayor of Tijuana declaring the situation a 'humanitarian crisis'. Some migrants have chosen to sleep in the streets due to poor conditions in the main temporary shelter located in a mostly outdoor soccer complex. Parts of the migrant caravan have been arriving to Tijuana after traveling for more than a month through Central America and Mexico to reach the U.S. border. 7 of 300
  • Early morning light illuminates the face of a migrant woman and her child as she wakes after sleeping under a bridge at the Chaparral border crossing in Tijuana, Mexico, Friday, Nov. 23, 2018. 8 of 300
  • Honduran mother Lorena sits on the street with two of her four children, Yasir, left, and Maria, who all traveled together for more than one month in the 'migrant caravan', on Nov. 23, 2018 in Tijuana, Mexico. 9 of 300
  • epaselect epa07183443 Central American migrants remain in a shelter at the Sports Center Benito Juarez, in Tijuana, Mexico, 22 November 2018. Dozens of Central Americans from the migrant caravan are faced with the dilemma of pursuing asylum in the USA and Canada or seeking refuge in Mexico.  EPA-EFE/MARIA DE LA LUZ ASCENCIO ORG XMIT: AME894610 of 300
  • Mexican riot police keep watch beneath onlookers on a bridge as members of the 'migrant caravan' rally outside the El Chaparral port of entry on Nov. 22, 2018 in Tijuana, Mexico. Parts of the migrant caravan have been arriving to Tijuana after traveling for more than a month through Central America and Mexico to reach the U.S. border. President Donald Trump today threatened to close the U.S.-Mexico border if the arrival of migrants leads to a loss of 'control' on the Mexican side.11 of 300
  • A migrant boy, part of the Central American migrants, plays with Mexico's Federal police at El Chaparral port of entry on the U.S.-Mexico border in Tijuana, Baja California state, Mexico on Nov. 22, 201812 of 300
  • Central American migrants rest at a shelter near the U.S.-Mexico border fence in Tijuana, Baja California state, Mexico, on Nov. 22, 2018. 13 of 300
  • Central American migrants rest at a shelter near the U.S.-Mexico border fence in Tijuana, Baja California state, Mexico, on Nov. 22, 2018. 14 of 300
  • U.S. Customs and Border Protection (CBP) agents take part in an operational readiness exercise at the San Ysidro port of entry in the U.S., as seen from Tijuana, Baja California State, Mexico, on Nov. 22, 2018.15 of 300
  • Border Patrol Agents and other law enforcement officials take part in a training exercise at the U.S. Port of Entry in San Ysidro, Calif. on Nov. 22, 2018.16 of 300
  • Migrant children, part of the Central American migrants, play with Mexico's Federal police at El Chaparral port of entry on the U.S.-Mexico border in Tijuana, Baja California state, Mexico on Nov. 22, 2018.17 of 300
  • A migrant man holds a U.S. flag as he is confronted by a line of Mexican police in riot gear, when they tried to cross the border at the Chaparral border crossing in Tijuana, Mexico on Nov. 22, 2018. The group marched peacefully to the border crossing to demand better conditions and pushed to enter the U.S. 18 of 300
  • Maria del Carmen Mejia holds her daughter Britany Sofia while standing in a line outside a migrant shelter in Tijuana, Mexico, on Nov. 22, 2018. 19 of 300
  • Two Honduran men pose as a photographer, at left, takes their picture after the group climbed the border wall separating Tijuana, Mexico, and San Diego, before climbing back down on the Mexican side on Nov. 21, 2018 as seen from San Diego.20 of 300
  • Several charter buses carrying migrants arrive at the Unidad Deportiva Benito Juarez sports complex in Tijuana, Mexico in the early morning hours on Nov. 21, 2018. The city of Tijuana is using the sports complex as a shelter for the migrants.21 of 300
  • Several charter buses carrying migrants arrive at the Unidad Deportiva Benito Juarez sports complex in Tijuana, Mexico in the early morning hours on Nov. 21, 2018. The city of Tijuana is using the sports complex as a shelter for the migrants.22 of 300
  • Several charter buses carrying migrants arrive at the Unidad Deportiva Benito Juarez sports complex in Tijuana, Mexico in the early morning hours on Nov. 21, 2018. The city of Tijuana is using the sports complex as a shelter for the migrants.23 of 300
  • Several charter buses carrying migrants arrive at the Unidad Deportiva Benito Juarez sports complex in Tijuana, Mexico in the early morning hours on Nov. 21, 2018. The city of Tijuana is using the sports complex as a shelter for the migrants.24 of 300
  • A migrant takes shelter at the Unidad Deportiva Benito Juarez sports complex in Tijuana, Mexico on Nov. 21, 2018. 25 of 300
  • A man showers at makeshift shelter for migrants in Tijuana, Mexico.26 of 300
  • Over 2,500 Central American migrants live at the Unidad Deportiva Benito Juarez, a makeshift shelter, in Tijuana, Mexico on Nov. 20, 2018. Migrants set up camp around the baseball stadium.27 of 300
  • Over 2,500 Central American migrants live at the Unidad Deportiva Benito Juarez, a makeshift shelter, in Tijuana, Mexico on Nov. 20, 2018. Migrants set up camp around the baseball stadium.28 of 300
  • U.S. Customs and Border Protection agents patrol before Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen tours the U.S.-Mexico border in San Diego on Nov. 20, 2018. 29 of 300
  • Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen tours the border with Chief Patrol Agent Rodney S. Scott, at the U.S.-Mexico border fence in San Diego on Nov. 20, 2018. Nielsen said   Make no mistake; you will not get into our country illegally. 30 of 300
  • Department of Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen visits the border in San Diego on Nov. 20, 2018. 31 of 300
  • A man tries to climb over the U.S.-Mexico border fence at Playas de Tijuana, Mexico on Nov. 18, 2018.32 of 300
  • Maritza Lara, a migrant from Honduras, jumps at the chance to find a job in Mexico in order to move out of the shelter where she lives in Tijuana on Nov. 19, 2018. Government and business leaders organized a month-long job fair aimed at helping migrants stay in Mexico, rather than pursue asylum claims in the United States. 33 of 300
  • Over 2,500 Central American migrants live at the Unidad Deportiva Benito Juarez, a makeshift shelter, in Tijuana, Mexico on Nov. 20, 2018. Migrants set up camp around the baseball stadium.34 of 300
  • U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers check the IDs of pedestrians crossing into the United States after reopening the San Ysidro port of entry on Nov.19, 2018, in Tijuana, Mexico.35 of 300
  • Over 2,500 mostly Central American migrants are currently staying at the Unidad Deportiva Benito Juarez, a makeshift shelter, in Tijuana, Mexico on Nov. 18, 2018. Migrants set up camp around the baseball stadium, propping up tents using whatever materials they have available. Bathrooms and outdoor showers were installed in the outfield. 36 of 300
  • U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers check the IDs of pedestrians crossing into the United States after reopening the San Ysidro port of entry on Nov.19, 2018, in Tijuana, Mexico.37 of 300
  • U.S. Customs and Border Protection officers check the IDs of pedestrians crossing into the United States after reopening the San Ysidro port of entry on Nov.19, 2018, in Tijuana, Mexico.38 of 300
  • A Central American migrant walks towards the United States, through Mexicali, Mexico, on Nov. 18, 2018. The Central American migrant caravan faced a desperate situation Friday as its numbers swelled at the US-Mexican border, where it got a cold welcome and a warning that its chances of entering the United States were almost nil. 39 of 300
  • Demonstrators stand under an indigenous statue of Aztec ruler Cuauhtemoc as they protest the presence of thousands of Central American migrants in Tijuana, Mexico, Sunday, Nov. 18, 2018. Protesters accused the migrants of being messy, ungrateful and a danger to Tijuana; complained about how the caravan forced its way into Mexico, calling it an invasion, and voiced worries that their taxes might be spent to care for the group as they wait possibly months to apply for U.S. asylum.40 of 300
  • A demonstrator against the Central American migrants in Tijuana confronts riot police near a temporary shelter, on Nov. 18, 2018, in Tijuana, Mexico. 41 of 300
  • Aerial view of people demonstrating against the Central American migrants in Tijuana, blocked by riot police near a temporary shelter, on Nov. 18, 2018, in Tijuana, Mexico.42 of 300
  • Members of the migrant caravan walk to the official border crossing to turn in requests for political asylum at the U.S.-Mexico border on Nov.17, 2018 in Tijuana, Mexico. Parts of the caravan have been arriving in Tijuana at the U.S. border, after traveling more than a month through Central America and Mexico. 43 of 300
  • People use a legal border crossing to walk from Tijuana, Mexico to the U.S., Sunday, Nov. 18, 2018. While many in Tijuana are sympathetic to the plight of Central American migrants and trying to assist, some locals have shouted insults, hurled rocks and even thrown punches at the migrants.44 of 300
  • Members of the Central American migrant caravan remain at a shelter in the city of Tijuana, Mexico, Nov. 17, 2018. 45 of 300
  • Playas de Tijuana resident Juantia Leon holds her poodle Mini while taking in the view of the Pacific Ocean next to the U.S.-Mexico border fence on Nov. 17, 2018, in Tijuana, Mexico. 46 of 300
  • U.S. authorities have been filling the Tijuana River with sand mounds and concertina wire, at the border line between Mexico and the United States, in preparation of Central American migrants moving towards the United States, seen from Tijuana, Mexico, on Nov. 18, 2018.47 of 300
  • A Central American migrant moving in a caravan towards the United States in hopes of a better life, waits for food outside a shelter in Tijuana, Mexico, on Nov. 17, 2018.  The Central American migrant caravan faced a desperate situation Friday as its numbers swelled at the US-Mexican border, where it got a cold welcome and a warning that its chances of entering the United States were almost nil. 48 of 300
  • A Central American migrant woman moving towards the United States in hopes of a better life, plays with a child at the Alfa y Omega shelter in Mexicali, Baja California state, Mexico, on Nov. 17, 2018.49 of 300
  • Central American migrants moving towards the United States in hopes of a better life, count coins at the Alfa y Omega shelter, in Mexicali, Baja California state, Mexico, on Nov. 17, 2018. 50 of 300
  • A couple embrace on the shore of Playa Tijuana backdropped by the barriers separating Mexico and the United States, where the border meets the Pacific Ocean, Saturday, Nov. 17, 2018. 51 of 300
  • Residents stand on a hill before barriers, wrapped in concertina wire, separating Mexico and the United States, where the border meets the Pacific Ocean, in Tijuana, Mexico, Saturday, Nov. 17, 2018. Many of the nearly 3,000 migrants have reached the border with California. The mayor has called the migrants' arrival an avalanche that the city is ill-prepared to handle. 52 of 300
  • Members of the migrant caravan wait in line to turn in requests for political asylum at the U.S.-Mexico border on Nov. 17, 2018 in Tijuana, Mexico. 53 of 300
  • Members of the migrant caravan walk to make requests for political asylum at the U.S.-Mexico border on Nov.17, 2018 in Tijuana, Mexico. 54 of 300
  • The U.S.-Mexico border is marked on Nov. 16, 2018 in San Ysidro, CA. U.S. border agencies continued to fortify the border with razor wire and additional personnel as members of the migrant caravan arrived to Tijuana across the border.  55 of 300
  • Members of the caravan of Central American migrants walk on a street in Tijuana, state of Baja California, Mexico on Nov. 16, 2018. Tension over the arrival of Central American migrants to the Mexican city of Tijuana increased when the Mayor of Tijuana, Juan Manuel Gastelum, accused the federal government of being 'indolent' for allowing them to enter the country, he announced a public consultation on their stay and declared 'zero tolerance' for those who violate the law. 56 of 300
  • People who are part of the migrant caravan rest at a shelter in Tijuana, Baja California, Mexico on Nov. 16, 2018. Tijuana prepares to host Central American migrants for months before the foreseeable difficulties they will have in order to cross the border to the United States.  57 of 300
  • A Central American migrant child moving with a caravan towards the United States in hopes of a better life, cries as she embraces a woman at the Alfa y Omega shelter in Mexicali, Baja California state, Mexico, on Nov. 16, 2018.  The Central American migrant caravan trekking toward the United States converged on the US-Mexican border Thursday after more than a month on the road, undeterred by President Donald Trump's deployment of thousands of American troops near the border. 58 of 300
  • A member of the US military stands in front of the border fence that divides the US and Mexico at Friendship Park on Nov. 16, 2018 in San Diego, Calif. 59 of 300
  • Members of the U.S. military install multiple tiers of concertina wire along the banks of the Rio Grande near the Juarez-Lincoln Bridge at the U.S.-Mexico border, Friday, Nov. 16, 2018, in Laredo, Texas. 60 of 300
  • Central American migrants, part of the caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, pray at a temporary shelter in Tijuana, Mexico, Friday, Nov. 16, 2018. 61 of 300
  • Sairy Hueso, part of the Central American migrant caravan, carries her daughter Etzabe Ponce, as she stands next to her husband while waiting in line to receive a number as part of the process to apply for asylum in the United States, at the border in Tijuana, Mexico Tijuana, Mexico, Friday, Nov. 16, 2018. 62 of 300
  • A U.S. Border Patrol agent looks through concertina wire during a tour of the San Ysidro port of entry Friday, Nov. 16, 2018, in San Diego. 63 of 300
  • Selvin Velazquez, a migrant from Honduras, bathes in the Pacific Ocean near the border structure in Tijuana, Mexico, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018. Members of a migrant caravan from Central America started to meet some local resistance as they continued to arrive by the hundreds in the Mexican border city of Tijuana, where a group of residents clashed with migrants camped out by the U.S. border fence.64 of 300
  • A man on the U.S. side of the border, top, works on the border structure as a man looks on, at the beach seen from Tijuana, Mexico, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018. 65 of 300
  • A woman and child are detained by U.S. Border Patrol agents as they sit between two border structures located on the U.S. side, seen from Tijuana, Mexico, Thursday, Nov. 15, 2018. It is unknown if the two are members of a migrant caravan, but migrants from a first of three caravans continue to arrive by the hundreds in Tijuana.66 of 300
  • Mexican Federal Police stop a fight between Honduran immigrants and Mexican residents of Playas De Tijuana. The migrants had set up a makeshift camp at Friendship Park in Playas De Tijuana on Nov 14, 2018. The Mexican residents demanded that the the migrants leave the area and threaten the migrants if they did not leave. Federal and Municipal Mexican police kept both groups separated and some incidents of violence broke out throughout the night.67 of 300
  • Honduran immigrants look on as Mexican residents of Playas De Tijuana confronted the migrants who had set up a makeshift camp at Friendship Park in Playas De Tijuana on Nov 14, 2018. 68 of 300
  • U.S. Customs and Border Protection officer keep an eye on Members of the fist wave of the migrant caravan as they visit Playas De Tijuana after arriving in Tijuana, Mexico on Nov. 13, 2018. The group of 350 migrants traveled in 9 buses on the last part of the trip from Hermosillo, Sonora.  69 of 300
  • Members of the fist wave of the migrant caravan visit Playas De Tijuana after arriving in Tijuana, Mexico on Nov. 13, 2018. 70 of 300
  • Members of the migrant caravan arrive on the outskirts of Tijuana, Mexico on Nov. 13, 2018. The group of 350 migrants traveled in 9 buses on the last part of the trip from Hermosillo, Sonora. 71 of 300
  • Members of the migrant caravan arrive on the outskirts of Tijuana, Mexico on Nov. 13, 2018. The group of 350 migrants traveled in 9 buses on the last part of the trip from Hermosillo, Sonora. 72 of 300
  • Members of the migrant caravan arrive on the outskirts of Tijuana, Mexico on Nov. 13, 2018. 73 of 300
  • Members of the migrant caravan arrive on the outskirts of Tijuana, Mexico on Nov. 13, 2018. The group of 350 migrants traveled in 9 buses on the last part of the trip from Hermosillo, Sonora. 74 of 300
  • Members of the migrant caravan arrive on the outskirts of Tijuana, Mexico on Nov. 13, 2018. 75 of 300
  • Mexican media swarm members of the fist wave of the migrant caravan as they arrive in Tijuana, Mexico on Nov. 13, 2018. 76 of 300
  • Members of the fist wave of the migrant caravan decided to head to Playas De Tijuana after arriving in Tijuana, Mexico on Nov. 13, 2018. 77 of 300
  • Members of the caravan of Central American migrants prepare to leave Mexico City, Mexico, and resume their journey to the United States on Nov. 10, 2018. After failing to get the UN to provide free transportation, thousands of migrants from the caravan of Central Americans camped in Mexico City agreed to prepare to leave the capital on Saturday and resume their march on foot to the United States. Groups of migrants, mostly young, did not comply with this decision and left early in the morning for Queretaro, north of the capital, although most of the approximately 5,000 people in the caravan remained in the camp, following the indications of Pueblo Sin Fronteras, the organization that accompanies them.78 of 300
  • Central American migrants travel on a truck after hitching a ride in Tepotzotlan, Mexico, as they resume their journey north after leaving the temporary shelter in Mexico City, Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018. 79 of 300
  • Central American migrants stand in line hoping to hitch a ride in Tepotzotlan, Mexico, as they resume their journey north after leaving the temporary shelter at the Jesus Martinez stadium, Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018. Thousands of Central American migrants were back on the move toward the U.S. border Saturday, after dedicated Mexico City metro trains whisked them to the outskirts of the capital and drivers began offering rides north.80 of 300
  • Central American migrants arrive in Tepotzotlan, Mexico, as they resume their journey north after leaving a temporary shelter in Mexico City, Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018. 81 of 300
  • Central American migrants ride an escalator at a subway station as they resume their journey north after leaving the temporary shelter at the Jesus Martinez stadium, in Mexico City, Saturday, Nov. 10, 2018. 82 of 300
  • Members of the second migrant caravan depart from the municipality of Matias Romero Oaxaca, to the state of Veracruz, Mexico on Nov. 9, 2018. After failing to get the UN to provide them with free transportation, thousands of migrants agreed to prepare to leave the capital on November 10 and resume their march on foot to the United States. 83 of 300
  • epa07154569 Members of the third migrant caravan, from El Salvador, arrive at the municipality of Matas Romero, in the state of Oaxaca, Mexico, 09 November 2018. A third caravan originating in El Salvador left the southern state of Chiapas today to enter Oaxaca and follow the same route as the previous contingents. After failing to get the UN to provide them with free transportation, the thousands of migrants from the caravan of Central Americans camped in Mexico City today agreed to prepare to leave the capital on Saturday and resume their march on foot to the United States.  EPA-EFE/Lusi Villalobos ORG XMIT: AME157184 of 300
  • Hundreds of members of the Central American migrant caravan move in the early hours toward their next destination on Nov. 04, 2018, in Isla, Mexico. The group of migrants, many of them fleeing violence in their home countries, last took a rest day on Wednesday and have resumed their march to the United States border. As fatigue from the heat, distance and poor sanitary conditions has set in, the number of people participating in the march has slowly dwindled, but a significant group are still determined to get to the United Sates. The U.S. will deploy more than 5,000 active-duty troops to the U.S.-Mexico border in an effort to prevent members of the migrant caravan from illegally entering the country.85 of 300
  • Migrants from Central American countries  headed towards the United States in hopes of a better life or to escape violence make a stop at a temporary shelter at a sports complex in Mexico City, on Nov. 4, 2018.86 of 300
  • A man bathes in the rain outside a temporary shelter set up for a splinter group of a migrant caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, in Cordoba, Veracruz state, Mexico, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018.87 of 300
  • Hundreds of members of the Central American migrant caravan move in the early hours toward their next destination on Nov. 04, 2018 in Isla, Mexico.88 of 300
  • U.S. Army soldiers from Ft. Riley, Kansas string razor wire near the port of entry at the U.S.-Mexico border on Nov. 4, 2018 in Donna, Texas. President Trump ordered the troops to border areas ahead of the possible arrival of an immigrant caravan in upcoming weeks.89 of 300
  • Migrant hands hold on inside a truck as hundreds of members of the Central American migrant caravan move in the early hours toward their next destination on Nov. 04, 2018 in Isla, Mexico.90 of 300
  • Migrants -mostly Hondurans- taking part in a caravan heading to the US, rest at the Asuncion temple -fitted out as a temporary shelter- in Puebla, Puebla state, Mexico, on Nov. 4, 2018.91 of 300
  •  A migrant taking part in a caravan heading to the US, stands in the Asuncion temple, outfitted as a temporary shelter, in Puebla, Puebla state, Mexico, on Nov. 4, 2018.92 of 300
  • Members of the migrant caravan continue to make their way from Ciudad Isla, in the state of Veracruz, to the state of Puebla, in Mexico.93 of 300
  • Migrants taking part in a caravan heading to the U.S., play at a park outside at the Asuncion temple in Puebla, Puebla state, Mexico, on Nov. 4, 2018. 94 of 300
  • Central American migrants continue moving towards the United States in hopes of a better life or to escape violence, head to a shelter after arriving in Puebla, Mexico, on Nov. 4, 2018.95 of 300
  • Members of the migrant caravan arrive at the shelter of the Church of the Assumption, in the city of Puebla, in Puebla state, Mexico, Nov. 4, 2018. 96 of 300
  • Members of the Central American migrant caravan move in the early hours towards their next destination on Nov. 04, 2018 in Isla, Mexico.97 of 300
  • Central American migrants sleep inside a church that opened its doors to members of a caravan who splintered off the main group in order to reach the capital faster, in Puebla, Mexico, early Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018. Thousands of Central American migrants resumed their push toward the United States on Sunday, a day after arguments over the path ahead saw some travelers splinter away from the main caravan, which is entering a treacherous part of its journey through Mexico. 98 of 300
  • Members of a U.S Army engineering brigade place Concertina wire around an encampment for troops, Department of Defense and U.S. Customs and Border Protection near the U.S.-Mexico International bridge, Sunday, Nov. 4, 2018, in Donna, Texas.99 of 300
  • Aerial view of migrants taking part in a caravan heading to the U.S., on their way to Isla, Veracruz  State, Mexico, on Nov. 3, 2018. 100 of 300
  • Migrants heading in a caravan to the U.S., help a child catch a ride on a truck on the road linking Sayula de Aleman and Isla, Veracruz state, Mexico, on Nov. 3, 2018. 101 of 300
  • Central American migrants, part of the caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, a ride on in the trunk of a taxi, in Acayucan, Veracruz state, Mexico, Saturday, Nov. 3, 2018. 102 of 300
  • The migrant caravan continues their journey to the United States through Ciudad Isla, state of Veracruz, Mexico, Nov. 3, 2018.103 of 300
  • Members of the migrant caravan continue their journey to the United States through Ciudad Isla, state of Veracruz, Mexico, on Nov. 3, 2018. 104 of 300
  • A boy gives food to central American migrants, part of the caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, as they travel on a truck, in Loma Bonita, Oaxaca state, Mexico, Saturday, Nov. 3, 2018.105 of 300
  • Members of the migrant caravan rest in a church upon their arrival in the city of Puebla, Mexico, Nov. 4, 2018.106 of 300
  • Migrants, mostly Hondurans, taking part in a caravan heading to the US, catch a ride on the road on their way to Isla, Veracruz  State, Mexico, on Nov. 3, 2018. 107 of 300
  • Members of the Central American migrant caravan move towards their destination of the United States border on Nov. 03, 2018 in Sayula de Aleman, Mexico. The group of migrants, many of them fleeing violence in their home countries, last took a rest day on Wednesday and has resumed their journey. As fatigue from the heat, distance and poor sanitary conditions has set in, the numbers of people participating in the trek has slowly dwindled but a significant group are still determined to get to the United States. President Donald Trump said Wednesday as many as 15,000 troops may be deployed to the U.S.-Mexico border in an effort to prevent members of the migrant caravan from illegally entering the country. 108 of 300
  • U.S. Army active duty troops from Ft. Riley, Kansas, 97th MP Battalion install protective wire along the Rio Grande at the U.S.-Mexico border on Nov. 2, 2018 in Hidalgo, Texas. U.S. President Donald Trump ordered the troops to the border to bolster security at points of entry where an immigrant caravan may attempt to cross in upcoming weeks. 109 of 300
  • Salvadorian migrants heading in a caravan to the US, cross the Suchiate River to Mexico, from Ciudad Tecun Uman, Guatemala, on Nov. 02, 2018. According to the Salvadorian General Migration Directorate, over 1,700 Salvadorians left the country in two caravans and entered Guatemala Wednesday, in an attempt to reach the US. 110 of 300
  • Hundreds of migrants -mostly Hondurans- taking part in a caravan heading to the US, gather before deciding to take the road on their way to Isla, Veracruz  State, Mexico, on Nov. 3, 2018. President Donald Trump on Thursday warned that soldiers deployed to the Mexican border could shoot Central American migrants who throw stones at them while attempting to cross illegally.111 of 300
  • Salvadorian migrants heading in a caravan to the US, cross the Suchiate River to Mexico, as seen from Ciudad Tecun Uman, Guatemala, on Nov. 02, 2018. 112 of 300
  • Salvadorian migrants heading in a caravan to the US, walk alongside the route, between Ciudad Hidalgo and Tapachula in Mexico on Nov. 02, 2018. 113 of 300
  • Central American migrants, part of the caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, get a ride on a truck in Donaji, Oaxaca state, Mexico, Friday, Nov. 2, 2018. The migrants had already made a grueling 40-mile trek from Juchitan, Oaxaca, on Thursday, after they failed to get the bus transportation they had hoped for. But hitching rides allowed them to get to Donaji early, and some headed on to a town even further north, Sayula.114 of 300
  • Central American migrants, part of the caravan hoping to reach the U.S. border, wait for a ride in Donaji, Oaxaca state, Mexico, Friday, Nov. 2, 2018. 115 of 300
  • Salvadorian migrants heading in a caravan to the US, cross the Suchiate River to Mexico, as seen from Ciudad Tecun Uman, Guatemala, on Nov. 02, 2018. According to the Salvadorian General Migration Directorate, over 1,700 Salvadorians left the country in two caravans and entered Guatemala Wednesday, in an attempt to reach the US.116 of 300
  • Salvadorian migrants with a national flag wait to enter the Guatemala-Mexico international border bridge in Ciudad Tecun Uman, Guatemala, on Nov. 2, 2018. 117 of 300
  • Salvadorian migrants wait to enter the Guatemala-Mexico international border bridge next to the customs building in Ciudad Tecun Uman, Guatemala, on Nov. 2, 2018. 118 of 300
  • Salvadorian migrants climb and jump over a fence to get to the Guatemala-Mexico international border bridge in Ciudad Tecun Uman, Guatemala, on Nov. 2, 2018.119 of 300
  • Salvadorian migrants wait to enter the Guatemala-Mexico international border bridge in Ciudad Tecun Uman, Guatemala, on Nov. 2, 2018. 120 of 300
  • Honduran migrants heading in a caravan to the US, arrive in Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, after crossing the Suchiate River from Ciudad Tecun Uman, Guatemala, on Nov. 02, 2018.121 of 300
  • Members of the Central American migrant caravan move to the next town at dawn on Nov. 02, 2018 in Matias Romero, Mexico. The group of migrants, many of them fleeing violence in their home countries, last took a rest day on Wednesday and has resumed their journey towards the United States border. As fatigue from the heat, distance and poor sanitary conditions has set in, the numbers of people participating in the trek has slowly dwindled but a significant group are still determined to get to the United States. President Donald Trump said Wednesday as many as 15,000 active-duty troops may be deployed to the U.S.-Mexico border in an effort to prevent members of the migrant caravan from illegally entering the country. 122 of 300
  • Members of the Central American migrant caravan move to the next town at dawn on Nov. 02, 2018 in Matias Romero, Mexico.123 of 300
  • Members of the Central American migrant caravan move to the next town at dawn on Nov. 02, 2018 in Matias Romero, Mexico.124 of 300
  • Another mass exodus of migrants, this time from El Salvador, in Tecun Uman, state of San Marcos, Guatemala  was preparing to cross into Mexico from  Thursday, Nov. 1, 2018.  Mexican immigration officers have started allowing small groups of 50 to 200 migrants to cross the international bridge between Tecun Uman, Guatemala and Ciudad Hidalgo, to give them the chance to apply to remain in Mexico as refugees.125 of 300
  • Migrants attempt to cross the Suchiate River separating Mexico from Guatemala on Nov. 1, 2018. Mexican immigration officers, federal police stood on the banks and Mexican Marines patrolled the river by boat.A Mexican immigration officer who was not authorized to speak said migrants from Central America are being offered the chance to apply for asylum to remain in Mexico as long as they can produce passports from their home countries or other documents ration.126 of 300
  • Kevin Vladimir, from El Salvador, looks at the route map while he joined another mass exodus of migrants, this time from El Salvador, was preparing to cross into Mexico from Guatemala Thursday, the large wave in less than two weeks.While Mexican immigration officers have started allowing small groups of 50 to 200 migrants to cross the international bridge between Tecun Uman, Guatemala and Ciudad Hidalgo, to give them the chance to apply to remain in Mexico as refugees, some migrants feared the offer was a trap to arrest and deport them.127 of 300
  • About 500 migrants lined the plaza of Tecun Uman, Guatamala. Some were waiting for a much larger group to arrive Thursday or Friday. Others said they didnt want to wait and planned to cross at 4 p.m. Thursday.128 of 300
  • In Huixtla, Mexico, Yeni Cananero, 30, said she and her husband joined hundreds of migrants who waded across the chin deep river with their four children because the bridge was blocked. They said Mexican helicopters hovered over the water to create waves to deter the migrants from attempting to cross.  She said her children almost drowned.Cantanero said they fled Honduras because gangs had threatened to kill their family.129 of 300
  • A second mass exodus of Central American migrants traveling in a caravan has entered Mexico and has reached the town of Huixtla about 50 miles north of the Guatemalan border.Migrants traveling with the group said 2,00O to 3,000 migrants are traveling in the caravan.130 of 300
  • For the first time buses were used to transport migrant women and children arrives in Juchitan de Zaragoza on Oct. 30, 2018. The president of the municipality has converted a vacant bus station into a temporary shelter for the migrants, offering the best conditions the migrants have experienced so far.131 of 300
  • A truck arrived packed with boxes filled with plastic bags already filled with snacks, water juice, and candy on On Oct. 30, 2018. Volunteers passed out plastic foam cups of coffee and bread in Juchitan de Zaragoza, Mexico.132 of 300
  • A boy with a US flag joins Salvadoran migrants embarking on a journey in caravan to the United States, in San Salvador on Oct. 31, 2018. Many Salvadorians inspired by the much larger Honduran caravan already in Mexico and striving to reach the United States, are heading for the border with Guatemala in the hope of eventually realizing the American dream and reaching the US. 133 of 300
  • Migrants -mostly Hondurans- taking part in a caravan heading to the US, begin their day at a temporary shelter in Juchitan, Oaxaca State, Mexico, on Oct. 31, 2018. President Donald Trump kept up the pressure on Mexico on Wednesday to halt groups of migrants heading to the American border, as the US enters the final stretch of campaigning before key midterm elections. Trump ordered thousands of troops to the southern border and threatened to end automatic citizenship for US-born children of immigrants.134 of 300
  • Migrants from El Salvador wait to be attended by Salvadoran migration authorities in La Hachadura, El Salvador, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018. A fourth group of about 700 Salvadorans set out from the capital, San Salvador, with plans to walk to the U.S. border, 1,500 miles away.135 of 300
  • Migrants from El Salvador start on their way to the United States, in San Salvador, El Salvador, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018.136 of 300
  • Migrants from El Salvador board a truck as they start on their way to the United States, from San Salvador, El Salvador, Wednesday, Oct. 31, 2018.137 of 300
  • Members of the Central American caravan line up at dawn for food in a camp on Oct. 31, 2018 in Juchitan de Zaragoza, Mexico. The group of migrants, many of them fleeing violence in their home countries, took a rest day on Wednesday and plan to resume their march towards the United States border on Thursday. As fatigue from the heat, distance and poor sanitary conditions has set in, the numbers of people participating in the march has slowly dwindled, but a significant group are still determined to get to the United Sates. It has been widely reported that the Pentagon will deploy 5,200 active-duty troops to the U.S.-Mexico border in an effort to prevent members of the migrant caravan from illegally entering the country. 138 of 300
  • Members of the Central American caravan wake up at dawn in a camp on Oct. 31, 2018 in Juchitan de Zaragoza, Mexico. 139 of 300
  • Thousands of Central American migrants traveling in a caravan that President Trump wants to stop at the US border began arriving in the city of Juchitan de Zaragoza before dawn on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2018 in the state of Oaxaca in southern Mexico.140 of 300
  • Central American migrants attempting to travel to the US border began arriving in the city of Juchitan de Zaragoza before dawn on Tuesday, Oct. 30, 2018 in the state of Oaxaca in southern Mexico. 141 of 300
  • Central American migrants traveling in a caravan looks at Oaxaca map while they move north towards United States. 142 of 300
  • Migrants from Honduras and other Central American countries traveling in a caravan headed for the U.S. reached the town of Santiago Niltepec in the state of Oaxaca. The town is still recovering from a powerful 8.2 earthquake last year, but the resident even came out to offer food, water, and shelter in the town's central plaza. The caravan passed through a Mexican immigration checkpoint on the way, but immigration officials stood by and let them pass. None of the migrants boarded buses that sat empty offering to take those who didn't want to go farther a chance to head back to their countries. Instead, the migrants jumped on flat-bed trucks, gasoline tankers, pickups and any other vehicle that slowed down to give them rides, while immigration officials stood and watched. 143 of 300
  • Migrants from Honduras and other Central American countries traveling in a caravan headed for the U.S. reached the town of Santiago Niltepec in the state of Oaxaca. 144 of 300
  • Migrants from Honduras and other Central American countries traveling in a caravan headed for the U.S. reached the town of Santiago Niltepec in the state of Oaxaca. The caravan passed through a Mexican immigration checkpoint on the way, but immigration officials stood by and let them pass. 145 of 300
  • Migrants from Honduras and other Central American countries traveling in a caravan headed for the U.S. rest in the town of Santiago Niltepec in the state of Oaxaca. 146 of 300
  • Alexandra Paisano Perez, 8, from Honduras eats orange given by humanitarian volunteers in Santiago Niltepec in the state of Oaxaca on Oct. 29, 2018. Most of the kids getting sick from heat exhaustion. 147 of 300
  • Central American migrant Osiris Jackelin Lagos Funez, 38, plays Juego doctorano game with her son Lesnar Itai Bejarano Lagos, 5, in Santiago Niltepec in the state of Oaxaca on Oct. 29, 2018.148 of 300
  • Migrants are hitching rides on trucks, in pickups and cars at an immigration checkpoint as immigration officers watch in Tapanatepec, Oaxaca, Mexico, on Oct. 29, 218.149 of 300
  • Migrants have more than 30 miles to go before reaching their destination in Santiago Niltepec in the state of Oaxaca.150 of 300
  • Migrants hitch rides on trucks in Tapanatepec, Oaxaca, Mexico, Monday.151 of 300
  • The caravan left at 3 am but still have more than 30 miles to go before reaching their destination in, Santiago Niltepec, in the state of Oaxaca.152 of 300
  • Migrants march from Tapanatepec, Oaxaca, Mexico, before reaching their destination in Santiago Niltepec in the state of Oaxaca.153 of 300
  • Coordinators from Pueblo Sin Fronteras say immigration authorities are trying to split up the caravan but so far have been unsuccessful. Migrants who break off from the caravan to travel on their own are being detained, coordinators said.154 of 300
  • Hitching rides on trucks, migrants press on toward Santiago Niltepec in the state of Oaxaca. As long as the migrants pass through the checkpoint as a group no one stops them.155 of 300
  • In Tapanatepec, Oaxaca, Mexico,  Monday, immigration authorities parked buses at the checkpoint to deport migrants back to the border but no one got on.  As long as the migrants pass through the checkpoint as a group no one stops them.156 of 300
  • The caravan of migrants pass through Tapanatepec, Oaxaca, Mexico on Monday.157 of 300
  • A small child gets a lift as the caravan procedes to Santiago Niltepec, Oaxaca, Monday.158 of 300
  • Coordinators from Pueblo Sin Fronteras say immigration authorities are trying to split up the caravan but so far have been unsuccessful. Migrants who break off from the caravan to travel on their own are being detained, coordinators said.159 of 300
  • Caravan migrants hitch rides on trucks at an immigration checkpoint as immigration officers  in Tapanatepec, Oaxaca, Mexico, Monday.160 of 300
  • Some migrants have collapsed on the side of the road to rest or sleep.161 of 300
  • A woman lifts a baby carriage aboard a truck while she and others hitch a ride, Monday, in Tapanatepec, Oaxaca, Mexico. At least one migrant has died falling off a moving vehicle onto the pavement.162 of 300
  • The migrants from Honduras and other Central American countries took a day off to rest on Oct. 28, 2018 in Tapanatepec, Mexico. Coordinators decided to rest after a migrant from Guatemala was attacked by migrants from El Salvador, who mistook the man for a kidnapper, a sign of rising tensions as the caravan inches forward.163 of 300
  • Maria Estrada shaves her husband Alex's moustache while they bathe in a river with other migrants while taking a day off to rest on Oct. 28, 2018 in Tapanatepec, Mexico. 164 of 300
  • Edwin Enamorado, 35, from Honduras with a family of 6, took a day off to rest on Oct. 28, 2018 in Tapanatepec, Mexico.165 of 300
  • The migrants from Honduras and other Central American countries took a day off to rest on Oct. 28, 2018 in Tapanatepec, Mexico.166 of 300
  • The migrants from Honduras and other Central American countries took a day off to rest on Oct. 28, 2018 in Tapanatepec, Mexico.167 of 300
  • The migrants from Honduras and other Central American countries took a day off to rest on Oct. 28, 2018 in Tapanatepec, Mexico.168 of 300
  • Gina Garibo, one of the organizers of the migrant caravan works on details for tomorrow's journey on Oct. 28, 2018, in Tapanatepec, Mexico.  169 of 300
  • Guatemalan security forces try to prevent Honduran migrants from reaching the Guatemala-Mexico international border bridge in Ciudad Tecun Uman, Guatemala, on Oct. 28, 2018.  A new group of Honduran migrants is trying to reach and cross the Guatemalan border into Mexico in the hope of eventually reaching the United States. 170 of 300
  • Migrants of the second caravan clash with the Guatemalan Police, in Tecun Uman, Guatemala on Oct. 28, 2018. Thousands of migrants broke the border fence between Guatemala and Mexico and crossed into the Mexican territory.  171 of 300
  • Central American migrants of the second caravan confront the police, in Tecun Uman, Guatemala on Oct. 28, 2018. 172 of 300
  • Central American migrants of the second caravan confront the police, in Tecun Uman, Guatemala on Oct. 28, 2018.173 of 300
  • Delsy Alondra, 2, cries while waiting with her mother to receive donated food in Tapanatepec, Mexico on Oct. 28, 2018. 174 of 300
  • As of Oct. 27, Ernesto Martinez, 27, and his wife Yesenia, 23, have been traveling with their three daughters, including a baby who was just 17-days-old when they joined the caravan.175 of 300
  • Ernesto Martinez, 27, and his wife Yesenia, 23, are traveling with their three daughters, including a baby who was just 17-days-old when they joined the caravan on Oct. 20. The family is from San Martin, Retalhuleu, Guatemala. They have pushed the baby in a stroller more than 180 miles crossing through the state of Chiapas, before reaching the state of Oaxaca on Oct. 27, 2018. 176 of 300
  • Bathing in the river offers a little relief from a day of walking in the oppressive heat for some of the thousands of migrants in the caravan on Oct. 27, 2018.177 of 300
  • Bathing in the river offers a little relief from a day of walking in the oppressive heat for some of the thousands of migrants in the caravan on Oct. 27, 2018.178 of 300
  • Thousands of migrants from Honduras and other Central American countries traveling in a caravan reached the state of Oaxaca on Oct. 27, 2018, after crossing through the entire state of Chiapas on their way to the U.S. border.179 of 300
  • Members of a US-bound migrant caravan cross a bridge between the Mexican states of Chiapas and Oaxaca after federal police briefly blocked them outside the town of Arriaga on Oct. 27, 2018. 180 of 300
  • A wall of police in riot gear blocks the highway to stop a caravan of thousands of Central American migrants from advancing, outside Arriaga, Chiapas state, Mexico on Oct. 27, 2018. Eventually police let them pass, with the agreement that the dialogue with authorities would continue at their next stop. 181 of 300
  • Members of a U.S.-bound migrant caravan stand on a road after federal police briefly blocked their way outside the town of Arriaga on Oct. 27, 2018. Hundreds of Mexican federal officers carrying plastic shields blocked the caravan from advancing toward the U.S. after several thousand of the migrants turned down the chance to apply for refugee status and obtain a Mexican offer of benefits. 182 of 300
  • A man stops to rest as a caravan of thousands of Central American migrants walk along the highway outside Arriaga, Mexico on Oct. 27, 2018. 183 of 300
  • Central American migrants wait on a path away from the the roadside after Mexican police in riot gear briefly blocked the highway to keep them from advancing, outside Arriaga, Chiapas state, Mexico on Oct. 27, 2018. 184 of 300
  • Honduran migrants taking part in a caravan heading to the U.S. wait on the road as they leave Arriaga on their way to San Pedro Tapanatepec, southern Mexico on Oct. 27, 2018.185 of 300
  • Members of the Central American caravan bathe in the municipality of Arriaga, state of Chiapas, Mexico, on Oct. 26, 2018. 186 of 300
  • Mexican Federal Police officers allow the Honduran migrants to pass as they leave Arriaga on their way to San Pedro Tapanatepec, southern Mexico on Oct. 27, 2018. 187 of 300
  • Angelica Esmeralda Sanchez,18, left, and her friend Ericka Martinez 28, both from El Salvador are with a new wave of several hundred migrants gathered near a park in Tecum Uman, Guatemala on Oct. 25, 2018. They are waiting to cross into Mexico and to head north to the United States.188 of 300
  • Migrants from Honduras and El Salvador cross from Guatemala to Mexico on a raft on Oct. 25, 2018.189 of 300
  • Border crossers from Guatemala, use a raft at cross the border into Mexico at Cuidad Hidalgo on Oct. 25, 2018.190 of 300
  • Mexican Federal Police and Immigration officers wait to check identification of the border crossers from Guatemala, who were crossing in a raft at Cuidad Hidalgo, Mexico on Oct. 25, 2018.191 of 300
  • Mexican Federal Police and Immigration officers check identification of the border crossers from Guatemala, who were crossing in a raft at Cuidad Hidalgo, Mexico on Oct. 25, 2018.192 of 300
  • Gerson de Jesus Zelaya, 6, from Honduras, eats a donated lunch near a park in Tecum Uman, Guatemala as he waits to cross from Guatemala to Mexico and to head north to the United States on Oct 25, 2018. 193 of 300
  • Several hundred migrants from Honduras and El Salvador gather near a park in Tecum Uman, Guatemala  as they wait to cross into Mexico on Oct 25, 2018. 194 of 300
  • Several hundred migrants from Honduras and El Salvador gather near a park in Tecum Uman, Guatemala  as they wait to cross into Mexico on Oct 25, 2018. 195 of 300
  • Mexican Federal Police and Immigration officers wait to check identification of the border crossers from Guatemala, who were crossing in a raft at Cuidad Hidalgo, Mexico on Oct. 25, 2018.196 of 300
  • Central American migrants heading in a caravan to the U.S., walk near Mapastepec, southern Mexico, Oct. 25, 2018.  Thousands of Central American migrants crossing Mexico toward the United States in a caravan have resumed their long trek, walking about 12 hours to their next destination.197 of 300
  • A girl rests while taking part in a U.S.-bound caravan traveling from Mapastepec to Pijijiapan Chiapas state, Mexico, Oct. 25, 2018.198 of 300
  • Central American migrants traveling with a caravan to the U.S. receive donated food outside the Catholic Church in Mapastepec, Mexico, Oct. 24, 2018.199 of 300
  • Central American migrants climb into a truck during a caravan to the U.S., near Mapastepec, Chiapas state, Mexico, Oct. 25, 2018.200 of 300
  • Central American migrants rest on the roadside near Mapastepec, southern Mexico, Oct. 25, 2018.201 of 300
  • Central American migrants take part in a caravan toward the U.S., traveling on foot or atop vehicles in Mapastepec on their way to Pijijiapan Chiapas state, Mexico, Oct. 25, 2018. 202 of 300
  • A Central American migrant walks along the road near Mapastepec, southern Mexico, Oct. 25, 2018.203 of 300
  • Central American migrants rest on the roadside near Mapastepec, southern Mexico, Oct. 25, 2018.204 of 300
  • Central American migrants walk and traveling aboard a truck near Mapastepec, southern Mexico, Oct. 25, 2018.205 of 300
  • Central American migrants travel from Mapastepec to Pijijiapan Chiapas state, Mexico, Oct. 25, 2018.206 of 300
  • Central American travel standing on the back of a truck in Mapastepec on their way to Pijijiapan Chiapas state, Mexico, Oct. 25, 2018.207 of 300
  • Central American migrants walk near Mapastepec, southern Mexico, Oct. 25, 2018.208 of 300
  • Central American migrants traveling with a caravan to the U.S. crowd onto a tractor as they make their way to Mapastepec, Mexico, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018. Thousands of Central American migrants renewed their hoped-for march to the United States on Wednesday, setting out before dawn with plans to travel another 45 miles of the more than 1,000 miles that still lie before them. 209 of 300
  • Central  American migrants taking part in a caravan heading to the U.S., walk in Huixtla, Chiapas state, Mexico, on Oct. 24, 2018. 210 of 300
  • A Central American migrant taking part in a caravan heading to the U.S., holds up a sign reading Thank you Mexico for opening your hearts to us, while he waits to cross the border from Ciudad Tecun Uman in Guatemala, to Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, Oct. 22, 2018.211 of 300
  • Central American migrants walking and aboard trucks head in a caravan to the U.S., in Huixtla, on their way to Mapastepec Chiapas state, Mexico, Oct. 24, 2018.212 of 300
  • Central American migrant Cristian pushes a carriage occupied by his daughters; Karen, 5, left, and Beiyi, 4, as they make their way to Mapastepec, Mexico, Wednesday, Oct. 24, 2018, in a caravan headed to the U.S.213 of 300
  • Central American migrants heading in a caravan to the U.S., walk in Escuintla on their way to Mapastepec Chiapas state, Mexico, Oct. 24, 2018. 214 of 300
  • Honduras' Human Rights National Commissioner Roberto Herrera is pictured after being briefed on the situation regarding the recent passage of a massive caravan of Honduran migrants, at the Guatemala-Mexico border bridge, in Ciudad Tecun Uman, Guatemala, on Oct. 23, 2018. Late Monday, Mexico allowed another group of about 400 migrants to enter the country after they spent days packed onto a bridge over the Suchiate River, which forms Mexico's southern border with Guatemala.215 of 300
  • Aerial view of the Guatemala-Mexico international bridge in Ciudad Hidalgo, Chiapas state, Mexico, on Tuesday.  The bridge remains empty a day after a caravan of Honduran migrants heading to the U.S. crossed it. The United Nations said more than 7,000 people were now heading toward the U.S., as more migrants joined the original group, including some Central Americans who were already in Mexico.216 of 300
  • A Honduran migrant is assisted after having a convulsion during a stop in Huixtla, Chiapas state, Mexico, on Tuesday. Thousands of mainly Honduran migrants heading to the United States -- a caravan President Donald Trump has called an assault on our country -- stopped to rest Tuesday after walking for two days into Mexican territory.217 of 300
  • Marvin Sanabria, a Central American migrant traveling with a caravan to the U.S., kneels in prayer after waking up, in Huixtla, Mexico, Tuesday. The caravan, estimated to include more than 7,000 people, had advanced but still faced more than 1,000 miles, and likely much further, to the end of the journey.218 of 300
  • Honduran migrants who were heading to the U.S., get on a bus to return to their country, after abandoning the caravan in Ciudad Tecun Uman, Guatemala, border with Mexico. - At least 25 Hondurans taking part in the migrant caravan, returned back to their country after reaching the Guatemalan border with Mexico.219 of 300
  • A Honduran migrant child brushes his teeth during a stop in their journey, in Huixtla, Chiapas state, Mexico, on Tuesday.220 of 300
  • Honduran migrants taking part in a caravan heading to the U.S., take a bath in the Huixtla river, in Huixtla, Chiapas state, Mexico. Forced by the violence and poverty of their country, desperate parents have exposed hundreds of babies and children to travel in a migrant caravan crossing Mexico to the United States, showing the cruelest face of this exodus.221 of 300
  • Migrants select clothing placed along the road by Mexican citizens during their journey to the United States, in Huixtla, Mexico. Hundreds of Mexicans distribute, altruistically from vehicles or on foot, food, water, medicine or clothing. 'The heart hurts when you see the children and there we feel the humanity of them, and how the Government does nothing', says Reina Lucia Ochoa, an inhabitant of the southeastern state of Chiapas.222 of 300
  • Migrants queue, Tuesday, to receive food during a stop in their journey, in Huixtla, Chiapas state, Mexico.223 of 300
  • Clothes dry in the sun by the bank of the Huixtla river, in Huixtla, Chiapas state, Mexico.  Thousands of mainly Honduran migrants head to the United States -- a caravan President Donald Trump has called an assault on our country.224 of 300
  • A Honduran migrant woman has an ultrasound done to check his pregnancy, on Tuesday, during a stop in their journey at the Central Park in Huixtla, Chiapas state, Mexico.225 of 300
  • Mexican citizens distribute medicines to  Honduran migrants, Tuesday, during their journey to the United States, in Huixtla, Mexico.226 of 300
  • Honduran migrant, Luis Lopez, taking part in a caravan heading to the U.S., walks with his dog during a stop in their journey, in Huixtla, Chiapas state, Mexico.227 of 300
  • A Honduran migrant couple and their five kids taking part in a caravan heading to the US, wait to cross the border from Ciudad Tecun Uman in Guatemala, to Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, on Oct. 22, 2018. President Donald Trump on Monday called the migrant caravan heading toward the US-Mexico border a national emergency, saying he has alerted the US border patrol and military.228 of 300
  • Honduran migrants taking part in a caravan heading to the US, aboard a truck in Metapa on their way to Tapachula, Chiapas state, Mexico, Monday.229 of 300
  • Migrants take part in a new caravan, Monday, heading to the US with Honduran and Guatemalan national flags in Quezaltepeque, Chiquimula, Guatemala.230 of 300
  • A truck in Metapa takes Honduran migrants on their way to Tapachula, Chiapas state, Mexico.231 of 300
  • An aerial view of Honduran migrants heading in a caravan to the US, Sunday, on the road linking Ciudad Hidalgo and Tapachula, Chiapas state, Mexico. President Trump called the caravan's approach a national emergency and said he has alerted the US border patrol and military, setting the stage for a confrontation when the swelling mass of migrants reach the border.We will now begin cutting off, or substantially reducing, the massive foreign aid that the United States provides to Guatemala, Honduras and El Salvador, he said.232 of 300
  • A Honduran migrant rests as he waits to cross the border from Ciudad Tecun Uman in Guatemala, to Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico.233 of 300
  • A mirant rests in a tent at the International Mesoamerican Fair's venue in Tapachula, Chiapas state, Mexico.234 of 300
  • A member of the Guatemalan Red Cross attends an Honduran migrant heading in a caravan to de US, in Ciudad Tecun Uman, Guatemala.235 of 300
  • Migrants are heading in a caravan to the US, in Tapachula, Chiapas state, Mexico, Monday.236 of 300
  • Migrant activist Irineo Mujica, center, holds a megaphone as a Central American migrant speak to reporters during a press conference in Tapachula, Mexico, Monday, Oct. 22, 2018. It is a shame that a president so powerful uses this caravan for political ends, said Mujica of the group Pueblo Sin Fronteras or People Without Borders, which works to provide humanitarian aid to migrants.237 of 300
  • Mexican President Enrique Pena Nieto takes a selfie with the next negotiator of the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) Jesus Seade Kuri (R) during the 17th Mexico Business Summit 'Facing the strategic challenges of Mexico and the Region', at the Guadalajara Expo, in Jalisco, Mexico, Monday. Pena Nieto warned that the Central American migrants of the caravan heading to the United States who do not respect the law will be unable to reach the country or remain in Mexico.238 of 300
  • Construction workers are seen by a reinforced section of the U.S.-Mexico border fence in Tijuana, Baja Calif. state, Mexico.239 of 300
  • Migrants onboard a truck take part in a caravan heading to the US, near Huehuetan, on their way from Tapachula to Huixtla, Chiapas state, Mexico.240 of 300
  • Migrants packed in the bed of a truck take part in a caravan heading to the US, near Huehuetan, on their way from Tapachula to Huixtla, Chiapas state, Mexico.241 of 300
  • Miigrants hitch a ride on a truck as they take part in a caravan heading to the US, in the outskirts of Tapachula, on their way to Huixtla, Chiapas state, Mexico.242 of 300
  • Migrants to the wait to cross the border from Ciudad Tecun Uman in Guatemala, to Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, Monday.243 of 300
  • Caravan  participants bathe using water from a fire hydrant at the main plaza in Tapachula, Mexico, Monday.244 of 300
  • Clothes belonging to a Honduran migrant hangs to dry on the fence of a border bridge that stretches over the Suchiate River, connecting Guatemala and Mexico, in Tecun Uman, Guatemala, Monday. Hundreds of migrants, who are part of a caravan bound for the U.S.-Mexico border are waiting on the border bridge to be attended by Mexican immigration authorities.245 of 300
  • A Central American migrant, who fell from the back of a moving vehicle and died, lies on a highway covered by a sheet outside of Tapachula, Mexico, Monday. Motorists in pickups and other vehicles have been offering the Central American migrants rides, often in overloaded truck beds, as the group of about 7,000 people heads to the U.S. border.246 of 300
  • Migrants hitch rides on all sorts of on vehicles, as they continue on another stretch of Mexican territory towards the United States, in this case a garbage truck.247 of 300
  • epa07111632 Honduran migrants remain on the bridge that divides Mexico from Tecun Uman, Guatemala, 22 October 2018. Thousands of Honduran migrants that are part of the caravan that seeks to cross Mexico to reach the United States are preparing for a new journey through the southeastern state of Chiapas.  EPA-EFE/Esteban Biba ORG XMIT: MEX0011248 of 300
  • A Mexican migrant boy remains next to tents at a shelter in Tijuana, Baja California state, Mexico, in the border with the US.249 of 300
  • Honduran migrants heading in a caravan to the US, arrive in Ciudad Hidalgo, Chiapas state, Mexico after crossing the Suchiate River from Guatemala, on October 20, 2018. - Thousands of migrants who forced their way through Guatemala's northwestern border and flooded onto a bridge leading to Mexico, where riot police battled them back, on Saturday waited at the border in the hope of continuing their journey to the United States. 250 of 300
  • epa07110455 Honduran migrants wait at the border bridge between Guatemala and Mexico in Tecun Uman, Guatemala, 21 October 2018. Around 200 Honduran migrants spent the night on the bridge between Guatemala and Mexico. People, including children, are still waiting to enter Mexican territory and continue their journey to the United States, as many thousands have done before.  251 of 300
  • Honduran migrants take part in a caravan heading to the US on the road linking Ciudad Hidalgo and Tapachula, Chiapas state, Mexico on October 21, 2018. - Thousands of Honduran migrants resumed their march toward the United States on Sunday from the southern Mexican city of Ciudad Hidalgo, AFP journalists at the scene said. 252 of 300
  • A Honduran migrant covers his face with sunscreen standing over a bridge that stretches over the Suchiate River connecting Guatemala and Mexico, in Tecun Uman, Guatemala, Sunday, Oct. 21, 2018. Guatemala's migration agency confirmed that another group of about 1,000 migrants crossed into the country from Honduras on Sunday. 253 of 300
  • A migrant heading in a caravan to the US, holds Mexican, US and Honduran national flags on the road linking Ciudad Hidalgo and Tapachula, Chiapas state, Mexico, on October 21, 2018. - Thousands of Honduran migrants resumed their march toward the United States on Sunday from the southern Mexican city of Ciudad Hidalgo, AFP journalists at the scene said. 254 of 300
  • Honduran migrants take part in a caravan heading to the US on the road linking Ciudad Hidalgo and Tapachula, Chiapas state, Mexico, Oct. 21, 2018.Thousands of Honduran migrants resumed their march toward the United States on Sunday from the southern Mexican city of Ciudad Hidalgo, according to news reports. 255 of 300
  • Honduran migrants take part in a caravan heading to the US on the road linking Ciudad Hidalgo and Tapachula, Chiapas state, Mexico, Oct. 21, 2018. 256 of 300
  • Honduran migrants taking part in a caravan heading to the US, cross the Suchiate River, the natural border between Guatemala and Mexico, in makeshift rafts, in Ciudad Tecun Uman, Guatemala, Oct. 21, 2018.257 of 300
  • Honduran migrants taking part in a caravan heading to the US, rest on the border of Guatemala and Mexico, in Ciudad Tecun Uman, Guatemala, Oct. 21, 2018.258 of 300
  • A Honduran migrant boy taking part in a caravan heading to the U.S., cries as he waits on the Guatemala-Mexico border bridge, in Ciudad Tecun Uman, Guatemala, Oct. 20, 2018.259 of 300
  • Honduran migrants taking part in a caravan heading to the US, sleep in the main square of Ciudad Tecun Uman, Guatemala, in the border with Mexico, on Oct. 20, 2018. Thousands of migrants who forced their way through Guatemala's northwestern border and flooded onto a bridge leading to Mexico, where riot police battled them back, on Saturday waited at the border in the hope of continuing their journey to the United States. 260 of 300
  • Honduran migrants, who were taking part in a caravan heading to the US, board a bus to return to Honduras, in Ciudad Tecun Uman, Guatemala, on Oct. 20, 2018. Some 220 Honduran migrants were returning to their country and some 130 were waiting at a shelter Saturday, according to a police source, while thousands who forced their way through Guatemala's northwestern border and flooded onto a bridge leading to Mexico, were waiting at the border in the hope of continuing their journey. 261 of 300
  • A Honduran migrant heading in a caravan to the US, prepares to jump to the Suchiate River from the Guatemala-Mexico international border bridge, near Mexican Federal Police officers, in Ciudad Hidalgo, Chiapas state, Mexico, on Oct. 20, 2018.262 of 300
  • A Mexican Federal Police officer stands guard on the bank of the Suchiate River in Ciudad Hidalgo, Chiapas state, Mexico, while a caravan of Honduran migrants heading to the US tries to get to Mexican territory from Guatemala, on Oct. 20, 2018.263 of 300
  • Honduran migrants heading in a caravan to the US, cross the Suchiate River, natural border between Guatemala and Mexico, helped by a rope, in Ciudad Hidalgo, Chiapas state, Mexico, on Oct. 20, 2018. 264 of 300
  • Honduran migrants heading in a caravan to the US, help others get down to the Suchiate River from the Guatemala-Mexico international border bridge, in Ciudad Hidalgo, Chiapas state, Mexico, on Oct. 20, 2018.265 of 300
  • Aerial view of a Honduran migrant caravan heading to the US, on the Guatemala-Mexico international border bridge in Ciudad Hidalgo, Chiapas state, Mexico, on Oct. 20, 2018. 266 of 300
  • A group of Honduran migrants arrives to the Mexican side of the border after crossing the Suchiate River aboard a raft made out of tractor inner tubes and wooden planks, on the the border with Guatemala, in Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, Saturday, Oct. 20, 2018. The entry into Mexico via the bridge that connects the two countries has been closed. The main group of migrants have moved about 30 feet back from the gate that separates them from Mexican police to establish a buffer zone. About 1,000 migrants now remain on the bridge between Guatemala and Mexico. 267 of 300
  • Honduran migrants await access on the bridge that crosses the Suchiate River after crossing the fence on the border with Guatemala to enter Mexico, in Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico on Oct. 19, 2018. 268 of 300
  • Police try to prevent hundreds of Honduran migrants to cross a police checkpoint to Guatemala, at the Agua Caliente border crossing, in Ocotepeque, Honduras on Oct. 19, 2018.269 of 300
  • A Guatemalan firefighter carries an ailing baby, as an Honduran migrant caravan heading to the US, reaches the Guatemala-Mexico international bridge in Tecun Uman, Guatemala on Oct. 19, 2018. 270 of 300
  • An Honduran migrant heading in a caravan to the US, is cooled down by police officers after struggling to cross one of the gates of the Guatemala-Mexico international border bridge in Ciudad Hidalgo, Chiapas state, Mexico, on Oct. 19, 2018. 271 of 300
  • Thousands of Honduran migrants wait for access on the bridge that crosses the Suchiate River after crossing the fence on the border with Guatemala to enter in Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico on Oct. 19, 2018. 272 of 300
  • A Honduran migrant mother and child cower in fear as they are surrounded by Mexican Federal Police in riot gear, at the border crossing in Ciudad Hidalgo, Mexico, Friday, Oct. 19, 2018. Central Americans traveling in a mass caravan broke through a Guatemalan border fence and streamed by the thousands toward Mexican territory, defying Mexican authorities' entreaties for an orderly migration and U.S. President Donald Trump's threats of retaliation. 273 of 300
  • A Honduran migrant girl kneels in front of a police checkpoint at the Agua Caliente border crossing in Ocotepeque, Honduras on Oct. 19, 2018. Honduran authorities intensified immigration control measures at the Agua Caliente point, bordering Guatemala, to prevent hundreds of Hondurans seeking to reach the USA from crossing into the neighboring country. 274 of 300
  • Honduran migrants climb a border fence, in Tecun Uman, Guatemala, Friday, Oct. 19, 2018. Migrants broke down the gates at the border crossing and began streaming toward a bridge into Mexico. After arriving at the tall, yellow metal fence some clambered atop it and on U.S.-donated military jeeps. Young men began violently tugging on the barrier and finally succeeded in tearing it down.275 of 300
  • TOPSHOT - Honduran migrants attempt to cross the border Goascoran River to enter illegally to El Salvador, in Goascoran, Honduras on October 18, 2018. - US President Donald Trump threatened Thursday to send the military to close its southern border if Mexico fails to stem the onslaught of migrants from Central America, in a series of tweets that blamed Democrats ahead of the midterm elections. (Photo by MARVIN RECINOS / AFP)MARVIN RECINOS/AFP/Getty Images ORG XMIT: 207 ORIG FILE ID: AFP_1A477L276 of 300
  • epa07104768 Rafters help Honduran migrants to cross the Suchiate River that divides Guatemala and Mexico in Escuintla, Guatemala, on 19 October 2018, from where they will continue their journey to USA.  EPA-EFE/ESTEBAN BIBA ORG XMIT: GU502277 of 300
  • epa07104770 Rafters help Honduran migrants to cross the Suchiate River that divides Guatemala and Mexico in Escuintla, Guatemala, on 19 October 2018, from where they will continue their journey to USA.  EPA-EFE/ESTEBAN BIBA ORG XMIT: GU502278 of 300
  • epa07104769 Honduran migrants rest in the Tecun Uman's park in Escuintla, Guatemala, 19 October 2018, before continue their way to Mexico. Migrants, who hope to arrive to the United States to seek better living conditions, slept in an open-air theater and in the Catholic church of Tecun Uman, a few kilometers from the Suchiate River, which divides Guatemala and Mexico, where a group of migrants has already started a new stage of the crossing.  EPA-EFE/ESTEBAN BIBA ORG XMIT: GU502279 of 300
  • epa07104767 Honduran migrants rest in the Tecun Uman's park in Escuintla, Guatemala, 19 October 2018, before continue their way to Mexico. Migrants, who hope to arrive to the United States to seek better living conditions, slept in an open-air theater and in the Catholic church of Tecun Uman, a few kilometers from the Suchiate River, which divides Guatemala and Mexico, where a group of migrants has already started a new stage of the crossing.  EPA-EFE/ESTEBAN BIBA ORG XMIT: GU502280 of 300
  • A woman, part of the group of Honduran migrants on the border of Honduras with El Salvador crosses the Goascoran River despite the increased flow caused by intense rains in the last hours, in El Amatillo, eastern Honduras, Oct. 18, 2018.281 of 300
  • A group of Honduran migrants on the border of Honduras with El Salvador continue their journey to the US at El Amatillo, eastern Honduras, Oct. 18, 2018. 282 of 300
  • Honduran migrants continue their march to the department of Escuintla to approach the border with Mexico leaving the Casa del Migrante shelter in Guatemala City, Guatemala, Oct. 18, 2018. 283 of 300
  • Migrants run to board a bus as part of a caravan of immigrants en route to the Mexican border in Guatemala City, Guatemala. Oct. 18, 2018. 284 of 300
  • Honduran migrants attempt to cross the border Goascoran River to enter illegally to El Salvador, in Goascoran, Honduras Oct. 18, 2018.285 of 300
  • A Honduran migrant holds up a replica of the Black Christ of Esquipulas as a caravan of migrants making their way to the U.S. arrives to Esquipulas, Guatemala, Monday, Oct. 15, 2018. The Guatemalan police blocked the road of the caravan for several hours before allowing the migrants to continue on their way. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo) ORG XMIT: XMC137286 of 300
  • ESQUIPULAS, GUATEMALA - OCTOBER 15:  A caravan of more than 1,500 Honduran migrants pauses at a Guatemalan police checkpoint after crossing the border from Honduras on October 15, 2018 in Esquipulas, Guatemala. The caravan, the second of 2018, began Friday in San Pedro Sula, Honduras with plans to march north through Guatemala and Mexico en route to the United States. Honduras has some of the highest crime and poverty rates in Latin America.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 775243532 ORIG FILE ID: 1052219302287 of 300
  • ESQUIPULAS, GUATEMALA - OCTOBER 15:  A caravan of more than 1,500 Honduran migrants moves north after crossing the border from Honduras into Guatemala on October 15, 2018 in Esquipulas, Guatemala. The caravan, the second of 2018, began Friday in San Pedro Sula, Honduras with plans to march north through Guatemala and Mexico en route to the United States. Honduras has some of the highest crime and poverty rates in Latin America.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 775243532 ORIG FILE ID: 1052219492288 of 300
  • A faint Honduran migrant woman is helped as Guatemalan police temporarily block the road after her caravan crossed the Honduras-Guatemala border without incident, in Esquipulas, Guatemala, Monday, Oct. 15, 2018. Police stopped the migrants for several hours but the travelers refused to return to the border and were eventually allowed to pass. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo) ORG XMIT: XMC136289 of 300
  • ESQUIPULAS, GUATEMALA - OCTOBER 15:  Honduran immigrants overnight at an migrant shelter on October 15, 2018 in Esquipulas, Guatemala. A caravan of at least 1,500 Central Americans, the second of its kind in 2018, began in San Pedro Sula, Honduras with plans to march north through Guatemala and Mexico in route to the United States. Honduras has some of the highest crime and poverty rates in Latin America.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 775243532 ORIG FILE ID: 1052270796290 of 300
  • ESQUIPULAS, GUATEMALA - OCTOBER 15:  A caravan of more than 1,500 Honduran migrants moves north after crossing the border from Honduras into Guatemala on October 15, 2018 in Esquipulas, Guatemala. The caravan, the second of 2018, began Friday in San Pedro Sula, Honduras with plans to march north through Guatemala and Mexico en route to the United States. Honduras has some of the highest crime and poverty rates in Latin America.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 775243532 ORIG FILE ID: 1052219378291 of 300
  • ESQUIPULAS, GUATEMALA - OCTOBER 15:  A caravan of more than 1,500 Honduran migrants pauses at a Guatemalan police checkpoint after crossing the border from Honduras on October 15, 2018 in Esquipulas, Guatemala. The caravan, the second of 2018, began Friday in San Pedro Sula, Honduras with plans to march north through Guatemala and Mexico en route to the United States. Honduras has some of the highest crime and poverty rates in Latin America.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 775243532 ORIG FILE ID: 1052219362292 of 300
  • Hondurans march in a caravan of migrants moving toward the country's border with Guatemala in a desperate attempt to flee poverty and seek new lives in the United States, in Ocotepeque, Honduras, Monday, Oct. 15, 2018. The group has grown to an estimated 1,600 people from an initial 160 who first gathered early Friday in a northern Honduras city. They plan to try to enter Guatemala on Monday. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo) ORG XMIT: XMC106293 of 300
  • epa07095951 Guatemalan policemen prevent Honduran migrants from crossing the Agua Caliente border, in Chiquimula, Guatemala, 15 October 2018. The migrant caravan aims to reach the United States fleeing the poverty and insecurity in their country  EPA-EFE/Esteban Biba ORG XMIT: GUA08294 of 300
  • A Honduran migrant holds up a replica of the Black Christ of Esquipulas as Guatemalan police temporarily block the road after the caravan crossed the Honduras-Guatemala border without incident, in Esquipulas, Guatemala, Monday, Oct. 15, 2018. The caravan began as about 160 people who first gathered early Friday to depart from San Pedro Sula, figuring that traveling as a group would make them less vulnerable to robbery, assault and other dangers common on the migratory path through Central America and Mexico. The group has since grown to at least 1,600 people. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo) ORG XMIT: XMC127295 of 300
  • ESQUIPULAS, GUATEMALA - OCTOBER 15:  A caravan of more than 1,500 Honduran migrants moves north after crossing the border from Honduras into Guatemala on October 15, 2018 in Esquipulas, Guatemala. The caravan, the second of 2018, began Friday in San Pedro Sula, Honduras with plans to march north through Guatemala and Mexico en route to the United States. Honduras has some of the highest crime and poverty rates in Latin America.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 775243532 ORIG FILE ID: 1052219350296 of 300
  • Honduran migrants holds up their national ID cards as Guatemalan police block them and their caravan after the group crossed the Honduras-Guatemala border without incident, in Esquipulas, Guatemala, Monday, Oct. 15, 2018. Police stopped the migrants for several hours but the travelers refused to return to the border and were eventually allowed to pass.  (AP Photo/Moises Castillo) ORG XMIT: XMC131297 of 300
  • ESQUIPULAS, GUATEMALA - OCTOBER 15:  A caravan of more than 1,500 Honduran migrants moves north after crossing the border from Honduras into Guatemala on October 15, 2018 in Esquipulas, Guatemala. The caravan, the second of 2018, began Friday in San Pedro Sula, Honduras with plans to march north through Guatemala and Mexico en route to the United States. Honduras has some of the highest crime and poverty rates in Latin America.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 775243532 ORIG FILE ID: 1052219454298 of 300
  • ESQUIPULAS, GUATEMALA - OCTOBER 15:  A caravan of more than 1,500 Honduran migrants moves north after crossing the border from Honduras into Guatemala on October 15, 2018 in Esquipulas, Guatemala. The caravan, the second of 2018, began Friday in San Pedro Sula, Honduras with plans to march north through Guatemala and Mexico en route to the United States. Honduras has some of the highest crime and poverty rates in Latin America.  (Photo by John Moore/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 775243532 ORIG FILE ID: 1052219320299 of 300
  • Honduran migrants walk past a roadblock of Guatemalan police as they make their way to the U.S., in Esquipulas, Guatemala, Monday, Oct. 15, 2018. Police stopped the migrants for several hours but the travelers refused to return to the border and were eventually allowed to pass. (AP Photo/Moises Castillo) ORG XMIT: XMC134300 of 300

The Post, quoting U.S. and Mexican officials, said the deal took shape last week in Houston during a meeting between Marcelo Ebrard, Mexico’s incoming foreign minister, and top U.S. officials, including Secretary of State Mike Pompeo and Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen.

In a statement, James McCament, acting undersecretary for policy for the Department of Homeland Security, said the administration has been working since July with the current Mexican government and incoming administration on “shared issues of concern.”

He said these include legitimate trade and travel, an interest in ensuring that those traveling to the U.S. borders do so safely and orderly, as well as “concern for the safety and security of vulnerable migrant populations, and respect for each nation’s sovereignty.”

The White House had no immediate comment on the Post report.

The agreement leaving asylum seekers in Mexico until their claims are heard in court could end the system derided by Trump as “catch and release,” which has generally allowed those seeking refuge to wait on safer U.S. soil.

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Several busloads of mostly Central American migrants traveling in a caravan arrived to Tijuana, Mexico.
USA TODAY

“For now, we have agreed to this policy of Remain in Mexico,” Olga Sánchez Cordero, the top domestic policy official under López Obrador, told The Post. She called it a “short-term solution.”

“The medium- and long-term solution is that people don’t migrate,” said Sánchez Cordero, the incoming interior minister. “Mexico has open arms and everything, but imagine, one caravan after another after another, that would also be a problem for us.”

 A federal judge issued a temporary restraining order this week blocking a Trump order that would deny protection to people who enter the country illegally seeking asylum.

“Whatever the scope of the president’s authority, he may not rewrite the immigration laws to impose a condition that Congress has expressly forbidden,” Judge Jon Tigar wrote in his order.

Trump responded by blasting “Obama judges” who challenge his orders, saying such judges make the border unsafe.

Contributing: Christal Hayes

Article source: http://rssfeeds.usatoday.com/~/581992174/0/usatodaycomwashington-topstories~Trump-says-asylum-seekers-will-wait-in-Mexico-wonapost-be-allowed-in-US-until-courts-approve/