Government shutdown: A look back at the major events, decisions and bills that got us here

WASHINGTON – It’s been nearly a month since parts of the government were shuttered due to contentious bickering over a southern border wall. 

Over the last 28 days, there have been high-stakes meetings, bills and Oval Office addresses seeking to end what’s become the longest shutdown on record. 

As President Trump readies a “major announcement” on the shutdown Saturday, here’s a look back at the major events and efforts to reopen federal agencies that have so far failed. 

Dec. 11: The White House meeting

It was a fight for the ages and the public was invited to watch.

President Donald Trump told Democratic leaders in a remarkable on-camera clash he would be “proud” to shut down the federal government if he doesn’t get the $5.7 billion he demands for a border wall with Mexico.

“If we don’t get what we want … we will shut down the government,” Trump said during an exchange in the Oval Office with House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., and Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, D-N.Y.

Pelosi and Schumer gave as good as they got, telling Trump he lacks support for border wall funding – even while Republicans still control the House – and is irresponsible in threatening to halt the government over a project that would be ineffective at best.

“You don’t have the votes,” Pelosi said.

Dec. 19: Senate passes bill to keep government open

A short-term spending bill that would fund the government through early next year cleared the Senate, a solution aimed at averting a government shutdown. 

Senators voted by voice vote to approve the spending measure, which would temporarily end a budget impasse by funding nine federal departments and several smaller agencies at their current funding levels through Feb. 8.

The bill was sent to the House for approval. 

More: Senate passes bill to avoid government shutdown; House vote comes next

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell, R-Ky., offered the temporary spending bill after President Donald Trump’s demand for $5 billion in funding for a wall along the nation’s southern border resulted in a standoff that threatened to shut down parts of the government. 

It wasn’t clear whether Trump would sign the measure but the White House appeared to retreat from Trump’s position of being “proud” to shutdown the government and take any blame for the impasse. 

White House spokeswoman Sarah Sanders said one day earlier that Trump asked his Cabinet secretaries to look for other sources of funding to help protect the border and suggested that the administration is looking to Congress for ways to avoid a shutdown.

Dec. 20: Trump won’t sign bill; House adds border funds

A deeply divided House voted to add $5 billion in border wall funding to a short-term spending bill, yielding to Trump’s demand for the money but casting further doubts that the government would shutdown. 

The bill, which the House approved by a vote of 217-185, was sent back to the Senate for another vote. 

More: House approves $5 billion in border wall funding to avoid government shutdown, forcing another Senate vote

The House vote capped a drama-filled day that started with lawmakers anticipating quick passage of an already approved Senate funding bill. The day broke into chaos after the president said he would not approve of the Senate’s bill since it did not include border funds. The announcement led to House members adding $5.7 billion for a border wall but also meant the Senate would have to vote again on the spending bill. 

“I’ve made my position very clear: Any measure that funds the government must include border security,” Trump said at the White House.

Dec. 22: The government shutdown begins

Post to Facebook

Posted!

A link has been posted to your Facebook feed.

U.S. Coast Guard Lt. Cmdr. Amy McElroy, left, and Lt. j.g. Sean Hill, who both missed a paycheck a day earlier during the partial government shutdown, talk about the stacks of fishing fleet inspections backing-up in the marine inspection office at Sector Puget Sound base, Jan. 16, 2019, in Seattle. The four civilian employees who normally handle the paperwork have been furloughed, leaving it to Hill to complete, along with his other duties. The Coast Guard is part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, which is unfunded during the shutdown, now in its fourth week. Elaine Thompson, APA TSA officer closes the entrance of the Miami International Airport’s Terminal G, during the ongoing the government shutdown, in Miami on Jan. 12,  2019. The current partial shutdown of the US federal government has become the longest in US history, on Jan. 12, surpassing the previous 21-day shutdown of 1995-1996. Over 800,000 federal employees are impacted by the shutdown, with around 400,000 furloughed and being paid later and the rest deemed ‘essential’, who must work without pay, though retroactive pay is expected, with Jan. 11 marking the first missed paycheck. CRISTOBAL HERRERA, EPA-EFEJack Lyons, a contractor working on massive rocket test stands for NASA, stands in his workshop while spending the furlough on his small side business making props for marching bands, in Madison, Ala., Jan. 8, 2019. “They’re trying to use people as bargaining chips, and it just isn’t right,” Lyons said. Unlike civil service workers who expect to eventually get back pay, Lyons doesn’t know if he’ll ever see a dollar from the shutdown period. David Goldman, AP

  • epa07290477 Democratic Senator from Vermont Patrick Leahy (R), Senate Minority Whip Dick Durbin (2-R) and Senate democrats carry photographs of furloughed federal workers during a press conference urging President Trump to reopen the government outside the US Capitol Capitol in Washington, DC, USA, 16 January 2019. Senate democrats outlined effects the shutdown, now in its 25th day, is having on American workers and families and called on President Trump to reopen the government immediately.  EPA-EFE/SHAWN THEW ORG XMIT: STX051 of 54
  • Furloughed contract workers, including security officers and custodians who have not been paid during the partial government shutdown, hold unpaid bills to present to the office of Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnell on Capitol Hill in Washington, DC, January 16, 2019. - Furloughed contract workers have not received back pay from previous government shutdowns, unlikely employees who work directly for the federal government.Four weeks into the US government shutdown, cash-strapped federal workers are tapping life-savings, selling possessions and turning to soup kitchens to make ends meet -- ramping up pressure for leaders in Washington to strike a deal. (Photo by SAUL LOEB / AFP)SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images ORIG FILE ID: AFP_1CA9HC2 of 54
  • U.S. Coast Guard Lt. Cmdr. Amy McElroy, left, and Lt. j.g. Sean Hill, who both missed a paycheck a day earlier during the partial government shutdown, talk about the stacks of fishing fleet inspections backing-up in the marine inspection office at Sector Puget Sound base Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Seattle. The four civilian employees who normally handle the paperwork have been furloughed, leaving it to Hill to complete, along with his other duties. The Coast Guard is part of the U.S. Department of Homeland Security, which is unfunded during the shutdown, now in its fourth week. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson) ORG XMIT: WAET1083 of 54
  • FILE In this Wednesday, Jan 16, 2019, file photo, U.S. Coast Guardsmen and women, who missed their first paycheck a day earlier during the partial government shutdown, walk off a 45-foot response boat during their shift at Sector Puget Sound base in Seattle. San Antonio-based USAA, a military personnel insurer and financial services company, said Wednesday they has donated $15 million for interest-free loans to Coast Guard members during the partial U.S. government shutdown. The funds will be disbursed by Coast Guard Mutual Assistance. The American Red Cross Hero Care Center will assist. (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson, File) ORG XMIT: CER3034 of 54
  • Aaron Hensley, left, is handed Stouffer's meals, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Solon, Ohio. Hensley and Joe Brodt, right, both work at NASA Glenn Research Center in Cleveland. The government shutdown has generated an outpouring of generosity to TSA agents and other federal employees who are working without pay. Hensley has been at NASA eight months and Brodt has just finished his one-year anniversary. (AP Photo/Tony Dejak) ORG XMIT: CD1025 of 54
  • A federal employee carries away a bag of free Kraft products outside a pop-up grocery store opened by Kraft to provide humanitarian aid to federal employees who have been affected by the ongoing shutdown in Washington, DC,  Jan. 17,  2019. Kraft opened the site, which will remain open through 20 January, so that federal employees can take a bag of free Kraft groceries home to their families. About 800,000 federal workers have been working without pay or have been furloughed. The shutdown began 22 December 2018 and is now the longest in US history with no clear end in sight.6 of 54
  • A man heading into the Sacramento International Airport passes demonstrators calling for President Donald Trump and Washington lawmakers to end the shutdown, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Sacramento, Calif. More than two dozen federal employees and supporters called for an end to the partial government shutdown now in its fourth week. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli) ORG XMIT: CARP3027 of 54
  • Airport operation workers wearing fluorescent safety jackets flipped burgers and hot dogs on a grill set up on a tarmac in front of a plane at Salt Lake City International Airport, Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Salt Lake City. In Salt Lake City, airport officials treated workers from the TSA, FAA and Customs and Border Protection to a free barbecue lunch as a gesture to keep their spirits up during a difficult time. (AP Photo/Rick Bowmer) ORG XMIT: UTRB1018 of 54
  • TSA employee Gary Vetterli prepares a hot dog during lunch at Salt Lake City International Airport, Jan. 16, 2019. The government shutdown has generated an outpouring of generosity to TSA agents and other federal employees who are working without pay. In Salt Lake City, airport officials treated workers from the TSA, FAA and Customs and Border Protection to a free barbecue lunch as a gesture to keep their spirits up during a difficult time.9 of 54
  • Erwin Guzman drops a food and supply donation for TAS workers at Orlando International Airport Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Orlando, Fla.  as the partial government shutdown moves through its fourth week Wednesday, Jan. 16, 2019, in Orlando, Fla. (AP Photo/John Raoux) ORG XMIT: FLJR10510 of 54
  • Security lines at Hartsfield-Jackson International Airport in Atlanta stretch more than an hour long amid the partial federal shutdown, causing some travelers to miss flights, Monday morning, Jan. 14, 2019. The long lines signaledstaffing shortagesat security checkpoints, as TSA officers have been working without pay since the federal shutdown began Dec. 22.11 of 54
  • Statues at the Korean War Veterans Memorial are covered in snow in Washington, DC, on Monday.  Federal offices and schools in the nation's capital are closed following a snowstorm this weekend that left an estimated accumulation of 8 to 12 inches of snow in the area. Despite the shutdown of the federal government, the National Park Service announced it would clear snow.  Almost three hundred miles of roads and over one hundred miles of sidewalks in the greater Washington DC area fall under the jurisdiction of the National Park Service.12 of 54
  • Jayda Mayfield, 10, carries her lunch tray to her seat in the cafeteria at the The Tommy Douglas Conference Center, Monday, in Silver Spring, MD. Mayfield and her mother Stacy Summerville accepted free meals for furloughed federal workers and their families offered by the Amalgamated Transit Union.13 of 54
  • Rep. Jamie Raskin (D-MD), left, greets Consumer Product Safety Commission employee Stacy Summerville as she gathered her lunch provided for furloughed federal workers and their families at the Tommy Douglas Conference Center in Silver Spring, MD, on Monday. The Amalgamated Transit Union will continue to offer meals for federal employees affected by the shutdown all week from 12 p.m. to 6 p.m.14 of 54
  • President Donald Trump speaks alongside fast food he purchased for a ceremony honoring the 2018 College Football Playoff National Champion Clemson Tigers in the State Dining Room of the White House in on  Jan. 14, 2019.  Trump says the White House chefs are furloughed due to the partial government shutdown.15 of 54
  • Guests select fast food Donald Trump purchased for a ceremony honoring the 2018 College Football Playoff National Champion Clemson Tigers in the State Dining Room of the White House, Monday.16 of 54
  • A snowman with a message about the government shutdown is pictured outside Capitol Hill17 of 54
  • A travelers walks past a closed down terminal at the Miami International Airport on Saturday, Jan. 12, 2019, in Miami. The partial government shutdown is starting to strain the national aviation system, with unpaid security screeners staying home, air-traffic controllers suing the government and safety inspectors off the job. (AP Photo/Brynn Anderson) ORG XMIT: FLBA10618 of 54
  • epaselect epa07278513 A TSA officer closes the entrance of the Miami International Airport's Terminal G, during the ongoing the government shutdown, in Miami, Florida, USA, 12 January 2019. The current partial shutdown of the US federal government has become the longest in US history, on 12 January, surpassing the previous 21-day shutdown of 1995-1996. Over 800,000 federal employees are impacted by the shutdown, with around 400,000 furloughed and being paid later and the rest deemed 'essential', who must work without pay, though retroactive pay is expected, with 11 January marking the first missed paycheck.  EPA-EFE/CRISTOBAL HERRERA ORG XMIT: CHU0219 of 54
  • TSA agent Anthony Morselli of Georgia, VT, shows his GoFundMe post on Facebook before starting his shift at Burlington International Airport on Friday, Jan. 11, 2019. Morselli and his wife, both TSA agents, didn't get paid along with approximately 800,000 other federal workers and, to try to make ends meet, started the GoFundMe site to try to pay the bills as the government shutdown entered it's 21st day. (Via OlyDrop)20 of 54
  • Nia Tagoai, a patient scheduler at a clinic offering health care and other services operated by the Seattle Indian Health Board, works at her desk Friday, Jan. 11, 2019, in Seattle.   Fallout from the federal government shutdown is hurting hundreds of Native American tribes and entities that serve them. The pain is especially deep in tribal communities with high rates of poverty and unemployment, and where one person often supports an extended family.  (AP Photo/Ted S. Warren) ORG XMIT: WATW20521 of 54
  • Tables sit empty during dinnertime at Rocket City Tavern near numerous federal agencies in Huntsville, Ala., Jan.. 9, 2019. Business at the restaurant is off at least 35 percent since the partial federal shutdown began. 22 of 54
  • A worker walks through the empty lobby of the federal Bureau of Alcohol, Tobacco, Firearms and Explosives' National Center for Explosives Training and Research in Huntsville, Ala.,  Jan. 9, 2019. About 70 federal agencies are located at the Army's sprawling Redstone Arsenal, and more than half the area economy is tied to Washington spending. 23 of 54
  • Jack Lyons, a contractor working on massive rocket test stands for NASA, stands in his workshop while spending the furlough on his small side business making props for marching bands, in Madison, Ala., Jan. 8, 2019. They're trying to use people as bargaining chips, and it just isn't right, Lyons said. Unlike civil service workers who expect to eventually get back pay, Lyons doesn't know if he'll ever see a dollar from the shutdown period.24 of 54
  • Katie Barron gestures while looking at a pay increase notice for her children's day care, in her home in Madison, Ala., Jan. 9, 2019. Barron's husband is a National Weather Service meteorologist forced to work without pay during the shutdown because his job is classified as essential. They've put off home and car maintenance, but the $450-a-week bill for day care still has to be paid, as do the mortgage and utility bills.25 of 54
  • Keisha Brown, 40, stands outside her home in the the Harriman Park neighborhood in Birmingham, Ala. on Wednesday, Jan. 9, 2019.  Brown's home is within a designated Superfund site in north Birmingham.  The EPA has been removing contaminated soil from yards in the neighborhoods within the site. The partial government shutdown has forced suspension of federal work at the nation's Superfund sites unless it is determined there is an imminent threat to life or property.26 of 54
  • Federal Aviation Administration employee Michael Jessie, who is currently working without pay as an aviation safety inspector for New York international field office overseeing foreign air carriers, holds a sign while attending a news conference at Newark Liberty International Airport, Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2019, in Newark, N.J. U.S. Sens. Cory Booker and Bob Menendez called a news conference at the airport to address the partial government shutdown, which is keeping some airport employees working without pay. (AP Photo/Julio Cortez) ORG XMIT: NJJC10127 of 54
  • Jenn Hallam demonstrated against the partial government shutdown on Independence Mall in Philadelphia, Tuesday, Jan. 8, 2019. (AP Photo/Matt Rourke) ORG XMIT: PX20428 of 54
  • epa07270355 Tourist on bikes stop at the entrance to Fort Point National Historic Site, a masonry seacoast fortification located on the southern side of the Golden Gate Bride, a popular tourist site is closed in San Francisco, California, USA, 08 January 2019. A partial shutdown of the US federal government continues since Congress and Trump failed to strike a deal before a 22 December 2018 funding deadline due to differences regarding border security. This shutdown, which has become the second-longest in US history, has affected about 800,000 federal workers. About 380,000 federal workers have been furloughed and an additional 420,000 have been working without knowing when they will next be paid. The National Park Service has said it will take funds from entrance fees to pay for cleaning up overflowing trash, patrolling of parks and other services.  EPA-EFE/JOHN G. MABANGLO ORG XMIT: JGM0129 of 54
  • PHILADELPHIA, PA - JANUARY 08:  David Fitzpatrick, 64, a Park Ranger, holds an American flag and a placard stating You're fired with Smokey the Bear, after a protest rally with furloughed federal workers and area elected officials in front of Independence Hall on January 8, 2019 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  The government shutdown, now lasting 18 days, marks the second longest United States in history, affecting about 800,000 federal employees.  (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 775278689 ORIG FILE ID: 107937966830 of 54
  • PHILADELPHIA, PA - JANUARY 08:  Tourists photograph the Liberty Bell, unable to go inside due to a lapse in federal appropriations on January 8, 2019 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  Furloughed federal workers and area elected officials held a protest rally beside it on Independence Mall.  The government shutdown, now lasting 18 days, marks the second longest United States in history, affecting about 800,000 federal employees.  (Photo by Mark Makela/Getty Images) ORG XMIT: 775278689 ORIG FILE ID: 107937956831 of 54
  • A disappointed young visitor, Asa Hazelwood, 3, pauses at the closed gates to the Smithsonian National Zoo in Washington, DC on Jan. 2, 2019. Asa's mother was unaware of the zoo's closure. The Smithsonian museums and the National Zoo are now closed to visitors during a partial shutdown as Congress and President Trump are at an impasse over funding of Trump's proposed southern border wall.32 of 54
  • Emma James, right, and co-worker Vincent Cuenca demonstrate outside the Federal Center on Goodfellow Boulevard, Jan. 4, 2019 in St. Louis.  James is a processor in the multifamily housing division. Cuenta processes payments to FEMA contractors.33 of 54
  • A Transportation Security Administration officer works at a checkpoint at Miami International Airport, Jan. 6, 2019, in Miami. The TSA acknowledged an increase in the number of its employees calling off work during the partial government shutdown. 34 of 54
  • Brandon Torres (center), the Branch Chief of Emergency Services at Grand Canyon National Park, directs guests in the park on Jan. 4, 2019. The park was staffed at minimum capacity due to the government shutdown but retained much of its services due to an executive order issued by Arizona Governor Doug Ducey to run the park with state funds in the event of a shutdown. 35 of 54
  • New brewing equipment, rear, sits idle in a warehouse used by the Alementary Brewing Co. in Hackensack, N.J., Jan. 7, 2019. The owners recently invested in one million dollars worth of new equipment and a new 13,000 sq ft warehouse which would increase their capacity five times, but due to the government shutdown, they have been unable to get the required licenses from the Alcohol and Tobacco Tax and Trade Bureau.36 of 54
  • A guard enters the closed National Archives building in Washington, DC on Dec. 22, 2018. A partial US government shutdown began at midnight, Dec. 22, when a funding agreement between Congress and President Trump could not be reached.37 of 54
  • Barricades block a closed campground at Joshua Tree National Park on Jan. 4, 2019 in Joshua Tree National Park, Calif. Campgrounds and some roads have been closed at the park due to safety concerns as the park is drastically understaffed during the partial government shutdown.38 of 54
  • Volunteers Alexandra (R) and Ruth Degen walk after cleaning a restroom at Joshua Tree National Park on Jan. 4, 2019 in Joshua Tree National Park, California. Volunteers with 'Friends of Joshua Tree National Park' have been cleaning bathrooms and trash at the park as the park is drastically understaffed during the partial government shutdown.39 of 54
  • Kunyanatt Chalothorn from Thailand takes a selfie with a closure sign at the entrance to the Smithsonian American Indian Museum in Washington, DC on Jan. 2, 2019.40 of 54
  • People watch as the Statue of Liberty and Ellis Island ferry transports passengers on Jan. 5, 2019, in New York, as the government shutdown enters its third week. New York state funds are being used to keep the attractions open during the shutdown which has affected National Parks.41 of 54
  • Nora Brooks a furloughed customer service representative for the Internal Revenue Service poses for a photograph at her home in Philadelphia, Jan. 3, 2019.   Brooks has been furloughed, worrying about whether she will need to seek a second job. The agency requires pre-approval to avoid conflicts of interest, but there's no one in the office to sign off. 42 of 54
  • A donation box sits on the counter as Dany Garcia speaks with visitors at the Ernest F. Coe Visitor Center in Everglades National Park, Jan. 4, 2019, in Homestead, Fla. Garcia is being paid by the Florida National Parks Association to work in the center during the partial government shutdown. As the shutdown drags on, private organizations, local businesses, volunteers and state governments are putting up the money and manpower to keep national parks across the U.S. open, safe and clean for visitors. 43 of 54
  • Federal contractor Chris Erickson paints his bathroom, Jan., 4, 2019, in North Salt Lake, Utah. Erickson says he'll run out of vacation days if the shutdown continues. The father of three from Salt Lake City will then crack into his savings, and he'll likely postpone a 14th wedding anniversary trip with his wife to a cabin. Erickson said he likely won't get the chance for reimbursement for the lost days because he's a contractor.44 of 54
  • Workmen from the commercial cleanup company 1-800-GOT-JUNK clean up trash on The Ellipse, south of the White House, in Washington, DC on Jan. 4, 2019. The company donated resources to clean up the area.45 of 54
  • In this Nov. 21, 2018, file photo, Justin Roth holds a handful of soybeans at the Brooklyn Elevator in Brooklyn, Iowa. The U.S. Department of Agriculture says it must delay the release of key crop reports due to the partial government shutdown. The announcement on Jan. 4, 2019 left investors and farmers without vital information during an already tumultuous time for agricultural markets. The USDA planned to release the reports Jan. 11 but said that even if the shutdown ended immediately, the agency wouldn't have time to release the reports as scheduled. 46 of 54
  • Visitors to Great Smoky Mountain National Park drive through the park on Jan. 5, 2019.  47 of 54
  • Correctional Officer Joseph Pellicano who is employed at United States Penitentiary at Canaan has been on staff for 12 and half years and will be working without pay until the government shutdown ends in Jessup, Pa., on Jan. 4, 2019.48 of 54
  • Two surfers walk past an open garbage bin and piles of trash at Ocean Beach in San Francisco, Jan. 3, 2019.49 of 54
  • Rebecca Maclean, a housing program specialist for the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development in Pittsburgh, sits outside her home in Pittsburgh, Jan. 3, 2019. Maclean, 41, has been on furlough since Dec. 21.  Her family's financial outlook isn't dire yet since her husband, Dan Thompson, owns a knife-making business and works as an elected constable. But the couple recently sat down to prioritize which bills must be paid on time and which can be paid late without dinging their credit history.50 of 54
  • Visitors walk past the Wall of Names at the Flight 93 National Memorial near Shanksville, Pa. on Jan. 2, 2019. Signs were posted on all doors stating that the facilities were closed because of the government shutdown, but that the grounds are open from sunrise to sunset.51 of 54
  • Trash lays on the grounds of the National Mall during the partial shutdown of the U.S. government on Jan. 2, 2019.52 of 54
  • Mike Gayzagian, a 49-year-old Transportation Security Administration officer at Boston's Logan International Airport, speaks with a reporter from The Associated Press at his home in Watertown, Mass on Jan. 3, 2019. Gayzagian, who has worked for the TSA more than a decade, got his last pre-shutdown paycheck last week, and he continues to report to work, as all TSA officers have since the government closed.  The 49-year-old said worrying about finances has made it difficult to concentrate on the work of keeping airports safe.53 of 54
  • A stop sign is seen near the White House during a government shutdown in Washington on Dec. 27, 2018.54 of 54

Federal government shutdown to begin at midnight after House, Senate fail to resolve budget impasse

At midafternoon, Vice President Mike Pence and two of Trump’s top lieutenants – Budget Director Mick Mulvaney and adviser Jared Kushner – traveled to the Capitol for a series of meetings to try to broker a deal.

An agreement proved elusive, but in what was hailed as a bit of a breakthrough, congressional leaders and the White House agreed to continue their talks after a procedural vote in the Senate. Yet even that incremental step required a tie-breaking vote by Pence.

Jan. 2: Dems meet with Trump at White House – again

Pelosi and Schumer left a meeting at the White House, telling reporters that both sides were no closer to resolving the dispute over border funds. 

Schumer said that Trump was using the shutdown as “hostage” to get what he wants. Democrats tried to persuade Trump to reopen the government and continuing to negotiate over funds for border security. 

“The only reason that they are shutting down the government is very simple,” Schumer said after the meeting. “They want to try and leverage that shutdown into their proposals on border security.”

Republicans agreed that no headway was made in negotiations to end the shutdown. 

Jan. 3: New Congress, new bills

New members of Congress were officially sworn in, giving Democrats control of the House. 

Later that evening, the House passed two measures that would reopen the government and postpone bickering over border wall funds to February, giving lawmakers and the White House another month to negotiate.

The measures were viewed as symbolic efforts as no additional border funds were included. Trump had repeatedly said he would not sign any bill that did not include the $5.7 billion he was requesting to construct the wall. 

Jan. 4: Trump’s threats 

Another meeting with top Democrats at the White House led to Trump teasing two new threats: to keep the shutdown going for possibly years and possibly declaring a national emergency to get the funding he desires for a border wall. 

After the meeting, Schumer told reporters that the president threatened to keep the government closed for “months or even years” if he doesn’t get the $5.7 billion for a wall. 

“We told the President we needed the government open. He resisted,” Schumer said. “In fact, he said he would keep it closed for a very long period of time, months or even years.”

More: Trump is weighing declaring emergency to get border funding without Congressional approval

The president, speaking from the Rose Garden, admitted he’d made the threat and when asked, told reporters that he was also discussing the possibility of declaring a national emergency to go around Congress and get funding for his wall, adding “I can do it if I want.” 

“We can call a national emergency because of the security of our country, absolutely,” Trump said. 

Jan. 8: Oval Office address, Dem response 

In his first formal Oval Office address, President Donald Trump told Americans that a border wall is needed to keep the country safe.

Trump sought to pressure Democrats to agree to his request for $5.7 billion as a condition of ending the government shutdown. He also tried to ramp up support among Republicans who are getting nervous about government workers and others who are feeling the pain of the shutdown.

Trump emphasized humanitarian issues in an apparent appeal to Democrats. But he also spent several minutes discussing what he said was a crime problem stemming from migrants entering the country illegally, although he did not note that migrants commit crimes at lower rates than U.S. citizens.

“To every citizen, call Congress and tell them to finally, after all of these decades, secure our border,” Trump said.

More: President Trump demands border wall in speech; Democrats accuse him of sowing fear

In their televised response, Pelosi and Schumer said Trump is using fear to try and achieve his wall at the expense of people who rely on government services.

“President Trump must stop holding the American people hostage, must stop manufacturing a crisis, and must reopen the government,” Pelosi said. 

Schumer added: “We don’t govern by temper tantrum,” explaining “no president should pound the table and demand he gets his way or else the government shuts down, hurting millions of Americans who are treated as leverage.”

Jan. 9: Trump storms out of meeting with Dems

CLOSE

After news of President Donald Trump walking out of a meeting with Congressional leaders to end the government shutdown, both sides of the aisle had differing opinions of who was at fault.
USA TODAY

Trump started off a meeting with top Democrats by offered candy. Things didn’t end as sweet. 

Trump walked out of a negotiating meeting with congressional leaders Wednesday and said he might declare a national emergency at the border after Democrats refused to yield to his demands for money for a border wall.

More: Trump walks out of meeting with congressional leaders, considers declaring emergency at border

Senate Minority Leader Charles Schumer, D-N.Y., said Trump abruptly ended the White House session after House Speaker Nancy Pelosi, D-Calif., said she did not support his border wall.

“He just got up and said we have nothing to discuss, and he walked out,” Schumer said. “He just walked out of the meeting.”

Schumer called Trump’s behavior “unbecoming of a president.”

Vice President Mike Pence and Republican lawmakers disputed the Democrats’ account and said the meeting ended after Democrats refused to offer a counterplan to reopen the government.

Republicans said that Trump offered to reopen the government immediately if Democrats would consider funding the $5.7 billion needed for a border wall. When Pelosi told him no, Trump left the meeting and said it was a waste of time. 

Jan. 10: Trump visits southern border; negotiations sour

Trump blasted Democrats and touted his proposed border wall during a visit to Texas on Thursday hours after making his most explicit threat yet to declare a national emergency and sidestep Congress on the issue. 

“If we had a barrier of any kind, a powerful barrier, whether its steel or concrete, we would stop it cold,” Trump said of the drugs, crime and human trafficking he has said are pouring into the United States in what the White House increasingly frames as a “crisis.”

Trump’s trip to McAllen, Texas, came hours after he laid out in his most explicit language yet a threat to bypass Democrats and declare a national emergency to free up additional funding for the border wall. 

More: Government shutdown: Trump tours border, claims Democrats ‘losing the argument’

“If this doesn’t work out, probably I will do it – I would almost say definitely,” Trump said of declaring a national emergency. 

While Trump was in Texas, the House worked to pass spending bills to reopen the government. The House passed measures to reopen the Agriculture Department, Department of Transportation and Department of Housing and Urban Development.

They also passed a measure to reopen federal financial agencies, such as the IRS and  Treasury Department, both of which are vital to the upcoming tax refund season. 

All of the bills aimed to put more pressure on Republicans and the Senate but were seen as symbolic as the president repeatedly said he would veto any measure that didn’t include border wall funding. 

Prominent lawmakers in Washington also met behind closed doors to find a compromise. Republican Sen. Lindsey Graham held several talks in hopes of coming to some agreement to end the shutdown but they hit a snag.

“I have never been more depressed about moving forward than right now. I just don’t see a pathway forward,” Graham said. He later called on Trump to declare a national emergency. 

Jan. 16: Pelosi says Trump should delay State of the Union

Pelosi asked the president to reschedule his State of the Union address this month if the government remains shuttered – or deliver it in writing.

“Sadly, given the security concerns and unless government re-opens this week, I suggest that we work together to determine another suitable date after government has re-opened for this address or for you to consider delivering your State of the Union address in writing to the Congress on January 29th,” Pelosi wrote in a letter to Trump on Wednesday.

More: Citing ‘security concerns’ due to government shutdown, Speaker Pelosi urges delay of State of the Union address

Pelosi cited Homeland Security Secretary Kirstjen Nielsen’s designation of State of the Union addresses as a “National Special Security Event,” which requires a high level of security. The Secret Service is responsible for such events, but the agency, a part of the Department of Homeland Security, is affected by the shutdown. 

House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy said Trump “has a right” to give the speech and that Americans “have the right” to hear it. 

“I think Speaker Pelosi is playing politics like I’ve never seen a speaker before,” McCarthy said. “I think it’s unbecoming of the office to disinvite the president.”

Jan. 17: Trump hits back, postpones Pelosi’s trip

Trump threw a punch back at Pelosi by canceling her military plane for an overseas trip just one day after she suggested postponing his State of the Union address.

“Due to the Shutdown, I am sorry to inform you that your trip to Brussels, Egypt and Afghanistan has been postponed,” Trump wrote in a letter to the California Democrat. “We will reschedule this seven-day excursion when the Shutdown is over.”

More: President Trump hits back at House Speaker Pelosi by canceling military plane for overseas trip

Trump didn’t address Pelosi’s request that he delay the State of the Union but focused instead on her overseas trip, which he called “a public relations event.” Trump said it would be better if Pelosi were in Washington “negotiating with me” to end a partial government shutdown that is nearing its fifth week.

“Obviously, if you would like to make your journey by flying commercial, that would certainly be your prerogative,” he concluded.

Jan. 19: Trump’s “major” announcement

Trump is preparing to give a speech on Saturday from the White House where he says he will make a “major announcement” about the southern border and the ongoing government shutdown.

Two officials familiar with the proposal told USA TODAY that Trump plans to offer Democrats protections for children of migrants who entered the United States illegally in exchange for his $5.7 billion border wall.

Congressional Democrats, however, questioned whether the offer would lead to a deal that would end the shutdown.

“It’s clearly a non-serious product of negotiations amongst White House staff to try to clean up messes the president created in the first place,” said one Democratic aide, speaking on condition of anonymity to await the president’s speech. “He’s holding more people hostage for his wall.”

Contributing: Michael Collins, David Jackson and Eliza Collins

Article source: http://rssfeeds.usatoday.com/~/593041338/0/usatodaycomwashington-topstories~Government-shutdown-A-look-back-at-the-major-events-decisions-and-bills-that-got-us-here/