Breaking News

'Nowhere to turn': Homeless with cancer, a Louisville man struggles each day to survive

CLOSE

When Louisville officials closed a downtown homeless encampment, Brent Spradlin, who has cancer, was left searching for a new place to live.
Sam Upshaw Jr., Louisville Courier Journal

Standing just up the block from the overpass he had called home in Louisville, Kentucky, Brent Spradlin felt drained. 

It’s the same way he’d felt for months. His sunken, gray eyes welled with tears.

“I feel ashamed that I am living here,” Brent said in a soft, raspy voice. “And when I get hungry, I have nothing to eat. I have no money. I have nowhere to turn to. … I just feel like jumpin’ off the bridge half the time. I have to say it. I never thought of suicide ’til now.

“I won’t never do it. But, I’ve sit here and cried for several nights, not knowing what to do.”

At 55, Brent is fighting throat cancer, living in a vacant lot and losing hope. 

His 5-foot-6 frame is nearly all bones. He weighs maybe 105 pounds.

Each day — until Tuesday, when city crews raked and removed most of his belongings in a sweep — he shuffled to his makeshift home atop the steep incline of the Interstate 65 overpass on Breckinridge Street. Each day, he endures oppressive heat and the relentless swarm of mosquitoes that come with it. 

For Brent and other homeless people living with serious, chronic illnesses, there are few places to turn in Louisville as they deal with true matters of life and death. 

The city’s homeless resources are stretched impossibly thin, and the waiting list for permanent housing seems endless. Shelter beds for those with disabilities and life-threatening conditions are scarce. There are some hospice beds, but only for those who end medical treatment.

“There’s a lot of Brents out here,” said Jeff Gill, founder of the street outreach group Hip Hop Cares. “There’s a lot more at stake than just clearing some people out, and Brent is a clear case of that.”

‘Baby Shark’: Florida officials play song on repeat to keep homeless people out of local park

At least seven homeless camps have been cleared in Louisville since March — including Brent’s on Tuesday — shuffling displaced people from camp to camp.

But the homeless with serious illnesses are especially hard-hit by these closures.

Brent was scheduled for chemotherapy two days before his camp initially was set to be cleared July 12.

He opted to reschedule his treatment rather than risk being too weak from the chemo to pack and haul his belongings to a new campsite. He wanted a new spot nearby to stay close to Norton’s campus for his medical appointments. 

His eviction was postponed, but only by four days. 

Post to Facebook

Posted!

A link has been posted to your Facebook feed.

  • Brent Spradlin walks down Brook Street on his way to a pharmacy.  He lives in a homeless camp beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets.  The city has posted signs that they will be removing the camps starting July 12.July 8, 20191 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin transports an array of items he has collected around downtown in a recycling waste receptacle as he walked down Brook Street on his way to a homeless camp.  The city has posted No Trespassing signs beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge where he lives.  They have given the people living there three weeks notice that the camps will be removed.June 25, 20192 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin became emotional as he talked about being homeless while suffering from colon and throat cancer.  The city has posted No Trespassing signs beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets where he lives.  They have given the people living there three weeks notice that the camps will be removed.June 25, 20193 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin, right, greeted LMPD Officer Tyler Gelnett with a forearm bump as they encountered one another in an alley.  Spradlin lives in a homeless camp beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets and the city has posted signs that they will be removing the camps starting July 12.July 8, 20194 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin became emotional as he talked about being homeless while suffering from colon and throat cancer. June 25, 20195 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin, right, accepted prayer from Lucrecia Gunn, of the Shekinah Glory International Ministries, beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets where he lives in a homeless camp.  He received some donated items from them.  Spradlin suffers from colon and throat cancer.  The city has posted No Trespassing signs and have given the people living there three weeks notice that the camps will be removed.June 25, 20196 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin sifts through an array of items he has collected around downtown in a homeless camp beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets.  The city has posted No Trespassing signs and have given the people living there three weeks notice that the camps will be removed.June 25, 20197 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin transports an array of items he has collected around downtown in a recycling waste receptacle as he walked down Brook Street on his way to a homeless camp.  The city has posted No Trespassing signs beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets where he lives.  They have given the people living there three weeks notice that the camps will be removed.June 25, 20198 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin, left, fist bumps Jeff Gill, founder of Hip Hop Cares street outreach, as he took a break from packing his belongings in a homeless camp beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets.  The city has posted signs that they will be removing the camps starting July 12.July 10, 20199 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin, right, and his friend Kim Morrow walk back to a homeless camp beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets where they live in tents next to each other.  They visited a pharmacy and picked up food and drinks at a gas station.  The city has posted signs that they will be removing the camps starting July 12.July 8, 201910 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin, left, fist bumps LMPD Officer Tyler Gelnett folowing a conversation as officers Nikolaos Katsareas and Tim King looked on.  They encountered each other in an alley.  Spradlin lives in a homeless camp beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets and the city has posted signs that they will be removing the camps starting July 12.July 8, 201911 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin sits next to his makeshift tent in a homeless camp beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets. Spradlin was stressed about moving from the camp after the city announced it would clear it. July 8, 201912 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin, right, and his friend Kim Morrow walk down an alley as they head to a pharmacy.  They live in a homeless camp beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets in tents next to each other.  The city has posted signs that they will be removing the camps starting July 12.July 8, 201913 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin, left, chats with Jeff Gill, founder of Hip Hop Cares street outreach, as he took a break from packing his belongings in a homeless camp beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets.  The city has posted signs that they will be removing the camps starting July 12.July 10, 201914 of 35
  • LMPD Officer Nikolaos Katsareas, right, ended a conversation with Brent Spradlin, left, with a fist bump as Officer Tyler Gelnett looked on.  They encountered each other in an alley.  Spradlin lives in a homeless camp beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets and the city has posted signs that they will be removing the camps starting July 12.July 8, 201915 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin starts the process of packing his belongings in a homeless camp beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets.  The city has posted signs that they will be removing the camps starting July 12.July 10, 201916 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin, right, and his friend Kim Morrow walk down Brook Street as they head to a pharmacy.  They live in a homeless camp beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets in tents next to each other.  The city has posted signs that they will be removing the camps starting July 12.July 8, 201917 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin starts the process of packing his belongings in a homeless camp beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets.  The city has posted signs that they will be removing the camps starting July 12.July 10, 201918 of 35
  • The city has posted No Trespassing signs beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets.  They have given the people living in homeless camps underneath three weeks notice that the camps will be removed.June 25, 201919 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin, right, and his friend Kim Morrow live in tents next to each other inside a homeless camp beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets.  They were searching for a potential new area to live after the city posted signs that they will be removing the camps starting July 12.July 8, 201920 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin looks for a spot to temporarily store a television monitor as he starts the process of packing his belongings in a homeless camp beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets.  The city has posted signs that they will be removing the camps starting July 12.July 10, 201921 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin, left, and his friend Kim Morrow walk down an alley as they head to a pharmacy.  They live in a homeless camp beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets in tents next to each other.  The city has posted signs that they will be removing the camps starting July 12.July 8, 201922 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin, right, relaxes with his friend Kim Morrow in a homeless camp beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets.  Spradlin lives in this makeshift tent next to her tent.  The city has posted signs that they will be removing the camps starting July 12.July 8, 201923 of 35
  • City crews cleared out a homeless camp where Brent Spradlin and his friend Kim Morrow lived next to each other beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets.  July 16, 201924 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin, left, placed his hand on his friend Kim Morrow's shoulder as they watched city crews clear out the remnants of a homeless camp beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets where they lived in tents next to each other.  July 16, 201925 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin relaxes in a homeless camp beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets where he lives.  The city has posted signs that they will be removing the camps starting July 12.July 8, 201926 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin, right, and his friend Kim Morrow walk down Brook Street as they head to a pharmacy.  They live in a homeless camp beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets in tents next to each other.  The city has posted signs that they will be removing the camps starting July 12.July 8, 201927 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin, right, relaxes with his friend Kim Morrow in a homeless camp beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets.  They live in tents next to each other.  The city has posted signs that they will be removing the camps starting July 12.July 8, 201928 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin used a cart to move his belongings as city crews cleared out the homeless camp beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets where he lived.  July 16, 201929 of 35
  • Kim Morrow, left, shows Brent Spradlin a sign she created to ask passersby for assistance.  They live in tents next to each other inside a homeless camp beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets.  The city has posted signs that they will be removing the camps starting July 12.July 8, 201930 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin moved his belongings to another site in anticipation of city crews clearing out the  homeless camp where he lived beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets.  July 15, 201931 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin, right, relaxes with his friend Kim Morrow in a homeless camp beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets.  They live in tents next to each other.  The city has posted signs that they will be removing the camps starting July 12.July 8, 201932 of 35
  • City crews cleared out a homeless camp where Brent Spradlin and his friend Kim Morrow lived next to each other beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets.  July 16, 201933 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin, right, relaxes with his friend Kim Morrow in a homeless camp beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets.  They live in tents next to each other.  The city has posted signs that they will be removing the camps starting July 12.July 8, 201934 of 35
  • Brent Spradlin moved his belongings to another site in anticipation of city crews clearing out the  homeless camp where he lived beneath the I-65 overpass at Brook and Breckinridge streets.  July 15, 201935 of 35

As homeless are suffering, risk of hepatitis, typhus and other diseases is growing

Brent has received disability income since 1995 for a back injury he sustained while working for years in construction. Between the roughly $770 a month he receives and Kim’s intermittent paychecks, the pair got by.

That changed last fall.

“I had some friends over,” Brent said. “My wallet came up missing with the rent money (in it), and it kind of went downhill real fast from there. I ended up being evicted.”

Brent’s church helped him collect some of the rent money, but it wasn’t enough. Evicted in November, Brent turned to the Salvation Army shelter for a bed while Kim went to the viaduct.

But the shelter limits how long people can stay. Once his time was up, Brent joined Kim under the overpass.

“It’s worse than jail, I would say,” Brent said. “… If it rains, it floods under there. Everything’s pretty much mildewed there from the rain. You have the rats.”

And then there is the noise. People “screamin’, hootin’, hollerin’, fightin’, arguin'” at all hours of the day and night, and the unceasing clanging, rattling and shaking of the interstate overhead. 

“At this point, I have to joke about it because if I don’t, I’m probably going to cry or go nuts,” Brent said.

Celebrities helping others: Jaden Smith celebrates his birthday with free vegan food truck for the homeless

After Tuesday’s sweep, he set up camp in a nearby vacant lot. The noise of the interstate is gone, but he has a new neighbor and the same old problems. His body, for one.

Over the years, he’s had back surgery, a hernia, a stroke, recurring struggles with addiction and now, the throat cancer. All of his teeth have been pulled — which is how he found out about his cancer three years ago.

Brent was getting ready for dentures when his dentist noticed a knot in his throat. Multiple rounds of antibiotics didn’t clear it up, so he went to an ear, nose and throat doctor.

That’s when Brent, who survived stage-three colon cancer in the early 2000s, found out he had cancer again.

“I’ve done radiation and chemo. I got stronger every day, but that about killed me,” he said. “I lost a lot of weight. But, I made it through.”

When they had the apartment, Kim was Brent’s caretaker. She cooked for him when he could eat and kept his feeding tube clean when he couldn’t. There were times she had to help him get out of the bathtub because he was so frail, and she went with him to countless doctor’s appointments.

“It has really zapped him,” she said.

Brent started to gain some weight and got his feeding tube out, but then he got evicted.

“And then it all went downhill,” he said.

Runway at the Salvation Army: Tears and second chances at a homeless shelter’s fashion show

‘We’re fighting a war’

Brent takes multiple prescriptions for nausea and Suboxone for his pain and withdrawals. For other homeless men and women managing chronic and life-threatening conditions, life can be even tougher. 

Local advocates say they’ve seen clients struggling with cancer, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, ostomy bags and amputations, along with mental illness and addiction.

“We’re fighting a war, and I don’t think most of us know what war we’re fighting,” Gill said. “There’s a lot of people out here that really need our help, need our attention and need our focus, and we’re letting them down. I talk to them daily. … I know that when they get put in certain situations it elevates mental illness and addiction and causes overdoses and suicides.

“Right now we’re stuck in a really vicious cycle, and we’ve got nowhere for them to go.”

Across the county, people with disabilities represent about one-quarter of adults experiencing homelessness.

People on the streets have higher rates of illnesses such as diabetes, hypertension and depression, and on average die 12 years sooner than the general population, according to the National Health Care for the Homeless Council.

Even the best medical care is not as effective if a patient is living on the street or in a shelter, a council report said.

A recent study by the University Louisville recommended that doctors and nurses go where homeless men and women live to provide them medical care. The report also recommended increasing the number of beds dedicated to medical respite care at shelters.

Homeless in college: Students sleep in cars, on couches when they have nowhere else to go

Natalie Harris, executive director of the Coalition for the Homeless, said Louisville has some short-term medical beds available, but it has nothing for people living on the streets with serious, long-term health conditions. 

The Salvation Army, for example, has six handicap-accessible beds for homeless men at its Brook Street shelter. Unlike the other beds, these are on the ground floor and have an accessible shower and toilet. 

However, as a temporary shelter, the Salvation Army limits how long clients can stay to 45 days a year unless they enter a case-management program.

Brent has already maxed out his allotted days at the Salvation Army for the year.

What many of these people need, Gill said, is assisted living. He can think of 10 people who could use that level of support right now.

But, Harris said, people without income have a hard time getting access to nursing homes.

There are also a small number of hospice care beds, she said, but only for those diagnosed as terminal and who have discontinued their treatment.

Trapped in a cycle of homelessness

For Brent, days under the overpass often blurred together.

On Tuesdays, he knew a church group would come with food and water. The other days, he’d amble to the next street up to grab a sack dinner.

In addition to his disability check, Brent used to receive about $50 in food stamps, but he let that benefit lapse.

He wishes he had it now.

He had a Section 8 housing voucher but lost it a decade ago after getting into trouble with the law. He has Medicaid, but it doesn’t cover all his health care costs.

Harris said a lot of homeless people qualify for disability income, but it’s not a quick or easy process without a permanent address.

They need their medical records, which “is not easy to do if you’ve been on the street for a long time,” Harris said. And many get rejected the first time they apply.

There are grant-funded options for housing support for Brent and others who are homeless with illnesses, Gill said. But it falls far short.

“The problem is they’re like a couple thousand deep into the waitlist because there’s not enough affordable housing,” he said.

These housing options also come with case management, follow-up appointments and other obligations that the homeless either are unable or unwilling to meet, Gill said. That’s why more paid outreach workers who can support people and provide transportation are so crucial, he said.

A lot of people may miss their appointments, become delayed in getting housing and lose hope in the process, he said.

Then, they are trapped on the street.

Good deeds: Obamas donate Sasha and Malia’s playground to homeless shelter

‘I don’t choose it’

The prospect of the looming camp clearout wore on Brent, and he grew more frazzled.

He felt overwhelmed and let down by his friends. They’d made promises to help they didn’t keep. The sultry temperatures in the 90s and the stale air under the viaduct made it all worse.

Brent said he still smokes half a pack a day to calm his nerves. It has gotten him this far, he figures.

What’s harder is staying away from crystal meth, given all the stress he’s under, Brent said.

“A lot of days I find myself pushing myself too much, and it catches up with me when I do stuff. But that’s something we can’t do here,” he said. “If you’re hungry, you have to get up and go and get it. If you don’t, you’re not going to eat, and later on, you’re going to be starving.

“It’s mind over matter.”

Column: Homeless kids is a problem we can solve

Gill, who has known Brent for several years, said he’s a loyal, good-spirited guy who never asks him for much. But now, Brent’s situation is wearing him down.

“I haven’t seen much positive change,” Gill said. “I’ve seen his health deteriorate. I’ve watched his mental state deteriorate. I’ve seen his frustration grow, and I’ve watched him struggle.”

Brent had put a lot of effort into making himself comfortable under the overpass. He fashioned a makeshift privacy screen with old sheets and shower curtains, and Kim’s neighboring tent had a welcome mat.

Brent would walk the steep, concrete incline of the viaduct in socks the same way a homeowner might shuffle to the kitchen for a snack.

He’d placed some shelving on the metal beams of the overpass and lined them with a mishmash of knickknacks and daily essentials: a can of SpaghettiOs, a nutcracker figurine, a cup of pens and a pair of scissors, a toy pickup truck, a University of Kentucky coffee mug.

The camp cleanout brought it all to an abrupt end.

He knew the things he dumpster-dived and collected in hopes of selling for extra cash couldn’t go with him. The vases and toy trucks would have to be left behind.

He’d already lost the pictures of his kids.

As Brent’s move grew closer, his frenzy increased over the prospect of packing. He itemized the things he’d need to take: food, hygiene products and his pants with drawstrings — the ones that still fit his wasting body.

“It’s caused friction between me and my kids. I don’t tell them or let them know where I’m at,” he said, his arms crossed and his gaze on the sidewalk, “because I’m ashamed. I thought by now I’d have a place.

“I don’t want my kids knowing I’m here. It’s not a good thing. I’m not proud of it, that’s for sure. I don’t choose it. I don’t want it.”

When the garbage trucks finally rolled in early Tuesday morning, Brent wished he had more time. He’d mostly salvaged what he wanted to keep, but it wasn’t easy to watch a sanitation worker swing a rake at the home he’d made.

“It hurts my heart to see this,” he said from the sidewalk below.

Of course, Brent wants a place of his own, “Or at least a backyard to rent and throw my tent up. Just some privacy at this point, and some peace of mind.”

Brent’s doctors have told him he can beat his cancer if he fights it.

“That’s what I’m doin’,” he said. “As we met, you see me fightin’. I’m not going to sit down and give up.”

As down as Brent feels, he still thinks about what his future could look like.

He wants to get back to church on Sundays.

He wants to learn about drafting blueprints and architecture, his curiosity stemming from his days building skyscrapers in Florida, where he earned $1 more per hour for every floor higher he worked.

But more than all that — more than anything — Brent wants to live.

Follow Tessa Duvall on Twitter: @TessaDuvall

Post to Facebook

Posted!

A link has been posted to your Facebook feed.

Ella Geotz, 6, from West Haverstraw, New York, right, jumps into the poll as sister Camille, 7, left, prepares for the splash at Bowline Point Park in Haverstraw on Saturday, July 20, 2019. John Meore, The Journal NewsSara Miller, of Dundalk, Md., and her dog Max, a Belgian Malinois, walks in the water at the dog beach at Quiet Waters Park in Annapolis, Md., Saturday, July 20, 2019. The National Weather Service said “a dangerous heat wave” was expected to break record highs in some places, particularly for nighttime. Susan Walsh, APDestinee Lucas, 6, of Aliquippa, Pa., rides a wave at the pool at Settlers Cabin Park, Thursday, July 18, 2019, in Robinson, Pa. Communities nationwide are bracing for a record-breaking heatwave that’s already roasting much of the U.S. to continue through the weekend. Alexandra Wimley, Pittsburgh Post-Gazette via APMya Jones, left, 12, and her cousin Alexis Carlen, 13, keep cool on a tubes floating around the Endless River at Raging Rivers Waterpark in Grafton, Ill., on Wednesday, July 17, 2019. An excessive heat warning has been issued for St. Louis through Saturday night. David Carson, St. Louis Post-Dispatch via APJaxon Claymore, 8, left, and his older brother Jalen, 9, battle each other with large water guns in the hot mid-day sun in front of their apartment building on Wednesday, July 17, 2019, Bismarck, N.D. The pair say they compete against one another at home and in school to see who is the best in sports from running, throwing and strength. The weather forecast for the area calls for temperatures in the 80s with little chance of rain for the next several days. Mike McCleary, The Bismarck Tribune via AP

  • James Catin, 12, of Nyack, New York, sits under a water sprayer on the splash pad at Nyack's Memorial Park on Friday, July 19, 2019.1 of 52
  • Ella Geotz, 6, from West Haverstraw, New York, right, jumps into the poll as sister Camille, 7, left, prepares for the splash at Bowline Point Park in Haverstraw on Saturday, July 20, 2019. 2 of 52
  • People float on tubes on The River, under the spray of water jets, at Tibbetts Brook Park in Yonkers, New York on July 20, 2019.  The hottest weekend of the year so far, brought out thousands of people to the area parks and pools. 3 of 52
  • Sara Miller, of Dundalk, Md., and her dog Max, a Belgian Malinois, walks in the water at the dog beach at Quiet Waters Park in Annapolis, Md., Saturday, July 20, 2019. The National Weather Service said a dangerous heat wave was expected to break record highs in some places, particularly for nighttime.4 of 52
  • Piper plays at the dog beach at Quiet Waters Park in Annapolis, Md., Saturday, July 20, 2019. 5 of 52
  • As a rainbow forms, Malik Bey leads guides Moose, a English Bulldog puppy, through a spraying fire hydrant on July 20, 2019 in Philadelphia, PA.  With heat indexes reaching 105 to 115 degrees today and tomorrow, an excessive heating warning has been designated for this weekend in multiple regions of the U.S.6 of 52
  • People enjoy the day playing in a water fountain as the Empire State Building is seen from Williamsburg section of Brooklyn on Saturday, July 20, 2019 in New York.  Americans from Texas to Maine sweated out a steamy Saturday as a heat wave spurred cancelations of events from festivals to horse races and the nations biggest city ordered steps to save power to stave off potential problems. 7 of 52
  • The Washington Monument is silhouetted against the morning sky as the sun rises at the start of a hot day in Washington, Saturday July 20, 2019. Temperatures in the Nation's Capital are expected to reach the upper 90s. 8 of 52
  • Track security officer Patty Patterson carries a bag of ice on her shoulders as she walks back to her post during a NASCAR Cup Series auto race practice at New Hampshire Motor Speedway in Loudon, N.H., Saturday, July 20, 2019. Temperatures were forecasted to reach nearly 100 degrees at the track.9 of 52
  • People shade themselves from the sun as they walk in Central Park in New York, New York on July 20, 2019. A heat wave is affecting some 180 million people at the East Coast and the Midwest regions of the US, with temperatures averaging 98 degrees.  10 of 52
  • A woman sunbathes in the Sheep Meadow in Central Park in New York, New York on July 20, 2019.11 of 52
  • A rower wipes sweat from his face with his jersey during the Philadelphia Youth Regatta on July 20, 2019 in Philadelphia, Pennsylvania.  With heat indexes reaching 105 to 115 degrees today and tomorrow, an excessive heating warning has been designated for this weekend in multiple regions of the U.S. 12 of 52
  • A poster is displayed outside a bar that is closed due to the heat on July 20, 2019 in Union Beach, New Jersey. An excessive heating warning designated for this weekend is affecting nearly two-thirds of the United States where more than 195 million people will experience temperatures above 90 degrees over the next few days. 13 of 52
  • The sun rises over New York City and the Empire State Building while a man sprays water at Pier A on Saturday, July 20, 2019 in Hoboken, N.J. Temperatures in the high 90s are forecast for Saturday and Sunday with a heat index well over 100. Much of the nation is also dealing with high heat. 14 of 52
  • Khloe Pachano, 8, wipes sweat from her face on July 19, 2019 near the Lincoln Memorial. Washington DC's heat index is forecast to surge past 100 degrees and approach the 110s on July 20, 2019. The heat index, also known as the apparent temperature, is what the temperature feels like to the human body when relative humidity is combined with the air temperature. 15 of 52
  • Children cool off in Crown Fountain in downtown as temperatures are forecast to head into the mid to high 90's with a heat index of around 115 degrees on July 19, 2019 in Chicago, Illinois. The heat wave gripping the city is affecting nearly two-thirds of the United states where more than 195 million people will experience temperatures above 90 degrees over the next few days. 16 of 52
  • Pitchfork Music Festival attendees of the first day of the music festival braved record-setting temperatures in Chicago, Friday, July 19, 2019.17 of 52
  • Cooling off at Pitchfork Music Festival in Union Park, Chicago, Friday, July 19, 2019. 18 of 52
  • Children put their faces in a fountain at a water park during an excessive heat watch in Washington, DC. on July 19, 2019. An excessive heat watch has been issued for the weekend in Washington DC. Meanwhile, a dangerous heat wave will cause close to 200 million people in the US to experience temperatures at 90 degrees Fahrenheit or higher this weekend, 19-21 July. 19 of 52
  • People try and stay cool in a fountain in Manhattan during the start of heat wave across the U.S. on July 19, 2019 in New York City. Much of the East Coast is experiencing abnormally high temperatures with highs expected over 100 degrees by the weekend.  20 of 52
  • People cool themselves by jumping into Lake Michigan at Chicago's North Ave Beach on Friday, July 19, 2019. A heat wave hits the Chicago greater area and temperatures are expected to reach high 90s. 21 of 52
  • Baltimore Orioles outfielder Keon Broxton douses himself with water while taking a break between fielding and batting practice prior to a baseball game against the Boston Red Sox, Friday, July 19, 2019, in Baltimore. A heat wave is hitting Baltimore and heat advisories have been set ahead of a hot weekend. 22 of 52
  • People try and stay cool in the fountain in Washington Square Park during the start of heat wave across the U.S. on July 19, 2019 in New York City. Much of the East Coast is experiencing abnormally high temperatures with highs expected over 100 degrees by the weekend. 23 of 52
  • People rest in the shade at the Lincoln Memorial on the National Mall in Washington, DC, on July 19, 2019.  Some 100 heat records are expected to fall this weekend, according to the National Weather Service, as a heat wave hits the midwest and eastern US. 24 of 52
  • People play in a waterfall at Yards Park in Washington, DC, July 19, 2019, as an extreme heat wave hits the region. Some 100 heat records are expected to fall this weekend, according to the National Weather Service, as a heat wave hits the midwest and eastern US. 25 of 52
  • Children cool down at the Petworth Spray Park in Washington, DC, on July 19, 2019. 26 of 52
  • A visitor uses an umbrella outside the National Museum of African American History and Culture, with the Washington Monument seen behind; during an excessive heat watch in Washington, DC. on  July 19, 2019. An excessive heat watch has been issued for the weekend in Washington DC. Meanwhile, a dangerous heat wave will cause close to 200 million people in the US to experience temperatures at 90 degrees Fahrenheit or higher this weekend,July 19-21.27 of 52
  • Tourists cool off in a sprinkler on the National Mall, on July 19, 2019 in Washington, DC.  An excessive heat warning has been issued for the Washington area as temperatures approach triple digits possibly breaking existing heat records. 28 of 52
  • A construction worker stops to cool off in the water fountains at Canal Park, on July 19, 2019 in Washington, DC.29 of 52
  • A boy plays in a fountain to cool off as temperatures approach 100 degrees Fahrenheit Thursday, July 18, 2019, in Kansas City, Mo. 30 of 52
  • Destinee Lucas, 6, of Aliquippa, Pa., rides a wave at the pool at Settlers Cabin Park, Thursday, July 18, 2019, in Robinson, Pa. Communities nationwide are bracing for a record-breaking heatwave that's already roasting much of the U.S. to continue through the weekend. 31 of 52
  • Abby Swank, 10, of Robinson, leaps off a diving board at the pool at Settlers Cabin Park, Thursday, July 18, 2019, in Robinson, Pa. 32 of 52
  • Julissa Hernandez, left, and Kuna Malik Hamad stay cool while practicing their Brazilian dancing under a fountain on the Georgetown Waterfront in Washington, DC on July 18, 2019. An 'Excessive Heat Watch' has been issued for the Washington, DC area through July 21st by the National Weather Service, with heat index values of up to 110 Fahrenheit. 33 of 52
  • Children cool off in the fountains at the Fred Cook Memorial Splash Park in Longfellow Park, Thursday July 18, 2019 in Murphysboro, Ill. An excessive heat warning for the region continues through Sunday with the heat index around 105 each day. 34 of 52
  • A Galapagos tortoise cools off in a shower of water from a zookeeper at the Oklahoma City Zoo, Thursday, July 18, 2019, in Oklahoma City. The National Weather Service has issued excessive heat warnings from the Southern Plains to Nebraska and as far east to New York State and parts of the East Coast. =35 of 52
  • A roofer works on a new home under construction Thursday, July 18, 2019, in Houston. A heat wave is expected to send temperatures soaring close to 100 degrees through the weekend across much of the country. The National Weather Service estimates that more than 100 heat records will fall on Saturday. Most will not be the scorching daily highs, but for lack of cooling at night, something called nighttime lows. Those lows will be record highs. 36 of 52
  • Mya Jones, left, 12, and her cousin Alexis Carlen, 13, keep cool on a tubes floating around the Endless River at Raging Rivers Waterpark in Grafton, Ill., on Wednesday, July 17, 2019. An excessive heat warning has been issued for St. Louis through Saturday night.37 of 52
  • A truck drives east out of Alton, Ill., over the Clark Bridge as clouds from a severe warned thunderstorm roll in on Wednesday, July 17, 2019. The storm knocked out power to thousands of customers in St. Louis County and St. Charles County. St. Louis is under excessive heat warning until Saturday night.38 of 52
  • Jaxon Claymore, 8, left, and his older brother Jalen, 9, battle each other with large water guns in the hot mid-day sun in front of their apartment building on Wednesday, July 17, 2019, Bismarck, N.D. The pair say they compete against one another at home and in school to see who is the best in sports from running, throwing and strength. The weather forecast for the area calls for temperatures in the 80s with little chance of rain for the next several days. 39 of 52
  • Devin Johnson (right) and James Watson (far left) sell water to tourists on July 17, 2019 near the Washington Monument. Washington DC's heat index values are predicted to reach 105 to 110 Fahrenheit due to temperatures in the mid 90s on July 17, 2019.  The nation's capital faces the hottest weather so far this summer as a heat wave is poised to spread across much of the central and eastern US over the next several days.40 of 52
  • Julian Bortey prepares to hand out water bottles for staff working in the heat for the Apollo 11's moon landing anniversary ceremony on July 17, 2019 near the Washington Monument. It's magic, Bortey said about the wet towel on his head.41 of 52
  • A woman cools off in the fountain at Washington Square Park during a hot afternoon day on July 17, 2019 in New York City. Sweltering heat is moving into the New York City area, with temperatures expected to rise close to 100 degrees by this weekend. The large heat wave will affect close to two thirds of the United States, with the East Coast and Midwest seeing the worst conditions.42 of 52
  • Tyler Secor 10, leaps off the high dive at the Kingston Community Pool to cool off as the temperatures rise Wednesday afternoon, July 17, 2019, in Kingston, Pa. Secor and other campers at the Kingston Recreation plan on spending much of the day keeping cool in the pool.43 of 52
  • A girl runs through the splash pad in Coal St. Park in Wilkes-Barre, Pa. on Tuesday, July 16, 2019.44 of 52
  • Nevaeha, 8, plays in the fountain at Canal Park on July 17, 2019. Washington DC's heat index values are predicted to reach 105 to 110 Fahrenheit due to temperatures in the mid 90s on July 17, 2019.  The nation's capital faces the hottest weather so far this summer as a heat wave is poised to spread across much of the central and eastern US over the next several days. 45 of 52
  • Rose Scott-Wright plays with her dog Cloie on July 17, 2019 at Canal Park. 46 of 52
  • Cincinnati Reds first base coach Delino DeShields wipes his face in the dugout during the fourth inning of a baseball game against the Chicago Cubs in Chicago, Wednesday, July 17, 2019. Chicago and much of the surrounding area will be under an excessive heat watch starting Thursday, as temperatures climb into the 90s, coming close to 100 degrees Friday and Saturday, with dangerously high heat indices, the National Weather Service declared Wednesday. 47 of 52
  • Amber Lewis escapes the heat with her kids Claire, 7, and Cameron, 9, at the Joannes Aquatic Center Tuesday, July 16, 2019, in Green Bay, Wis. 48 of 52
  • Reba, an Asian Elephant, is sprayed down with a hose by elephant trainer Monica Uhl at the Phoenix Zoo, July 16, 2019. The Phoenix Zoo hosted a press tour to showcase how the staff keeps their animals cool during the hot summer season. 49 of 52
  • Kiara Schmidt and Maddy Schreiber, right, beat the heat while enjoying a snow cone from Sno-Biz on Tuesday, July 16, 2019, in Kimberly, Wis.50 of 52
  • Poblocki Paving employee Daniel Huaracha takes a moment Monday July 15, 2019 to wipe the sweat away while paving a parking lot in Brown Deer, Wis. The job was just one of many where employees working outside are doing what they can to deal with the high heat and humidity we are experiencing this week. 51 of 52
  • Russ Wilson splashes water on his face from a fountain in New York, Wednesday, July 17, 2019. The heat wave that has been roasting much of the U.S. in recent days is just getting warmed up, with temperatures expected to soar to dangerous levels through the weekend. 52 of 52

Loading...

Best Wordpress Plugin development company in India     Best Web development company in India

Related posts

George H.W. Bush apologizes after actress accuses him of groping

Times of News

How to return almost anything without a receipt

Times of News

Top court snubs challenge to California gun waiting period

Times of News