Washington

'I tried to hold back tears': First two Muslim congresswomen react to New Zealand tragedy

CLOSE

Nihad Awad, the National Executive Director for the Council on American-Islamic Relations, said that the killing of at least 49 people in a mass shootings at two New Zealand mosques was “inspired by hate mongers in the United States. And in Europe.” (March 15)
AP

WASHINGTON – Two freshmen congresswomen who were the first Muslim women ever elected to Congress reacted to New Zealand mosque attacks with heartbreak on Friday. 

Rep. Rashida Tlaib, D-Mich., and Rep. Ilhan Omar, D-Minn., both elected in November, reacted with both pain and worry for Muslims across the world after 49 people were killed in targeted attacks at two mosques in the city of Christchurch.

“This morning I tried to hold back tears as I hugged my two brown, Muslim boys a little tighter and longer,” she said in a statement. “I am so angry at those who follow the ‘white supremacy’ agenda in my own country that sends a signal across the world that massacres like this is some kind of call to action.” 

She said that today was Jumu-ah, a prayer held each Friday, and she prayed that other Muslims would be “protected and can find some kind of peace.” Tlaib also posted a photo of her cuddling with her two sons, the two boys smiling. 

“I hope that our children don’t become numb to this, and that this is not their new normal,” Tlaib said. 

Post to Facebook

Posted!

A link has been posted to your Facebook feed.

  • Chalk messages outside a Mosque in Kilbirnie, Wellington. on March 16, 2019 in Kilbirnie, New Zealand. At least 49 people are confirmed dead, with more than 40 people injured following attacks on two mosques in Christchurch on Friday afternoon. 41 of the victims were killed at Al Noor mosque on Deans Avenue and seven died at Linwood mosque. Another victim died later in Christchurch hospital. Three people are in custody over the mass shootings. One man has been charged with murder.1 of 34
  • Mourners gather at a Mosque in Kilbirnie, Wellington on March 16, 2019 in Kilbirnie, New Zealand.2 of 34
  • A boy places Flowers outside a Mosque in Kilbirnie, Wellington on March 16, 2019 in Kilbirnie, New Zealand. 3 of 34
  • Women pray and prepare for the weekly Jum'a prayer service at the Southern California Islamic Center in Los Angeles, Calif. on March 15, 2019. Yesterday, a man opened fire at two Mosques in New Zealand, killing 49 and wounding many more.4 of 34
  • Various community leaders and officers comfort each other during a press conference at the Southern California Islamic Center in Los Angeles, Calif. on March 15, 2019. The press conference was organized after a man opened fire at two Mosques in New Zealand, killing 49 and wounding many more.5 of 34
  • An islamic woman walks into the Southern California Islamic Center before the weekly Jum'a prayer service in Los Angeles, Calif. on March 15, 2019. 6 of 34
  • Hedab Tarifi, previous chairperson of the Southern California Islamic Center meet and talk with various LAPD officers before a press conference at the Southern California Islamic Center in Los Angeles, Calif. on March 15, 2019. 7 of 34
  • A woman prays before for the weekly Jum'a prayer service at the Southern California Islamic Center in Los Angeles, Calif. on March 15, 2019. 8 of 34
  • People leave the Islamic Cultural Center of New York under increased police security following the shooting in New Zealand, Friday, March 15, 2019, in New York.9 of 34
  • Rabbi Linda Holtzman, second from right, attends an interfaith service held in honor and solidarity with the people killed in the deadly attacks on mosques in New Zealand at an Masjidullah Mosque in Philadelphia, Friday, March 15, 2019.10 of 34
  • Supporters stand on the street prior to midday prayers at the Islamic Center of DC following the news of New Zealand mosque shootings. 11 of 34
  • People write messages on a sheet of paper during a gathering to commemorate the victims of an attack on two mosques in New Zealand at the New Zealander Embassy in Brussels on March 15, 2019. A right-wing extremist armed with semi-automatic weapons rampaged through two mosques in the quiet New Zealand city of Christchurch during afternoon prayers on March 15, killing 49 worshippers and wounding dozens more.12 of 34
  • White roses from a delegation of religious in France are displayed at the entrance hall of the New Zealand Embassy in France, in Paris, Friday, March 15, 2019. France is increasing security measures at mosques and other religious sites after the deadly attack against two mosques in New Zealand. 13 of 34
  • JoAnn Huber is hugged by Sarah Rana as she exits worship at the Islamic Society of Tulsa to members of Tulsa's interfaith community with Tulsa Metropolitan Ministry  greet worshippers as they leave Islamic Society of Tulsa, Friday, March 15, 2019 in Tulsa, Okla. The group showed up to show support in the wake of the New Zealand mosque shootings. 14 of 34
  • Members of Tulsa's interfaith community with Tulsa Metropolitan Ministry make signs to greet worshippers as they leave Islamic Society of Tulsa Friday, March 15, 2019. 15 of 34
  • The floral tributes grow on Deans Avenue near the Al Noor Mosque as locals pay tribute to those who were killed on March 16, 2019 in Christchurch, New Zealand. 16 of 34
  • Gregory Glaros of Arlington, VA stands outside of the Islamic Center of DC showing support following the news of New Zealand mosque shootings on March 15, 2019.17 of 34
  • A Washington DC Metropolitan police officer parked near the front gates of a quiet Islamic Center of DC following the news of New Zealand mosque shootings on March 15, 2019.18 of 34
  • Melbourne United players observe a minute's silence for the victims of the Mosque shooting in Christchurch, New Zealand during game three of the NBL Grand Final Series between the Perth Wildcats and Melbourne United at RAC Arena on March 15, 2019 in Perth, Australia. 19 of 34
  • Turkish police secure the plaza in front of he Byzantine-era Hagia Sophia, one of Istanbul's main tourist attractions Hagia Sophia in Istanbul, Turkey, Friday, March 15, 2019. Turkey's President Recep Tayyip Erdogan says at least three Turkish citizens were injured in the attack that targeted Muslim worshippers in New Zealand and that he has spoken to one of them.20 of 34
  • Demonstrators chant slogans against the mosque attacks in New Zealand during a protest in Istanbul, Friday, March 15, 2019. At least 49 people were killed in mass shootings at two mosques full of worshippers attending Friday prayers on what the prime minister called one of New Zealand's darkest days. 21 of 34
  • Pakistanis protest to condemn the New Zealand mosque shooting, in Karachi, Pakistan, Friday, March 15, 2019. Pakistan's prime minister Imran Khan has condemned attacks on two mosques in New Zealand, saying he blames rising Islamophobia. Khan wrote Friday on Twitter that terrorism does not have a religion.22 of 34
  • The New Zealand national flag is flown at half-mast on a Parliament building in Wellington on March 15, 2019, after a shooting incident in Christchurch. 23 of 34
  • Flowers are placed on the front steps of the Wellington Masjid mosque in Kilbirnie in Wellington on March 15, 2019, after a shooting incident at two mosques in Christchurch. 24 of 34
  • Bangladeshi Muslims offer Friday prayers after protesting against attacks on two mosques in New Zealand, in Dhaka on March 15, 2019. 25 of 34
  • Indian Muslims and clerics hold posters to condemn the mass shooting that occurred at multiple mosques in New Zealand city of Christchurch, during an Islamic seminary in Mumbai on March 14, 2019. A right-wing extremist armed with semi-automatic weapons rampaged through two mosques in the quiet New Zealand city of Christchurch during afternoon prayers on March 15, killing 49 worshippers and wounding dozens more.26 of 34
  • Delegates stands during a minute of silence after the mass shooting that occurred in New Zealand during a meeting of the United Nations Human Rights Council on March 15, 2019, in Geneva.27 of 34
  • A cricket supporter holds a sign reading Terrorism has no religion real Muslims aren't terrorists!, after the mass shooting that occurred in New Zealand, during the 2nd elimination PSL Twenty20 match between Peshawar Zalmi and Islamabad United in Karachi on March 15, 2019.28 of 34
  • Muslims attend a vigil at the East London Mosque for the victims of the New Zealand mosque attacks on March 15, 2019 in London, England. Patrols have been increased after 49 people were killed in mass shootings at two mosques in central Christchurch, New Zealand, on Friday. 29 of 34
  • Young demonstrators hold banners from multi-faith group 'Turn to Love' during a vigil at New Zealand House in London, Friday, March 15, 2019. 30 of 34
  • A demonstrator hangs banners from multi-faith group 'Turn to Love' during a vigil at New Zealand House in London, Friday, March 15, 2019. 31 of 34
  • A wreath placed by Britain's leader of the opposition Labour Party Jeremy Corbyn at New Zealand House in London, Friday, March 15, 2019. 32 of 34
  • In the wake of the deadly attack against two mosques in New Zealand, police officers sit in their vehicle out side the Al Aqsa Islamic Society mosque in Philadelphia, ahead of prayers Friday, March 15, 2019. 33 of 34
  • Worshippers arrive for service at the Islamic Cultural Center of New York under increased police security following the shooting in New Zealand, Friday, March 15, 2019, in New York. 34 of 34

Omar echoed those sentiments. She told reporters that she didn’t see the news until she woke up Friday morning in disbelief. 

“Love trumps hate,” she said. “And so we just have to make sure that we are resilient, loving and that we are creating an environment that recognizes all of our work.” 

Omar said she worried about the level of hatred in fringe groups, such as what the suspects in the attack were involved in, but said those terrorists should not be given any credence or be allowed to win. 

She called on everyone — Muslim or not — to pray and not be afraid to go to mosques and “join them in solidarity.” 

“I know that there was a call for people to not go, and I said to people that is what the terrorist want us to do. That is a win for them,” Omar said. “And so we must face the hate and terror with love and with compassion.”

CLOSE

Dozens of peoples were gunned down after a gunman opened fire in two Islamic mosques in Christchurch, New Zealand.
USA TODAY

The New Zealand attacks occurred the Al Noor mosque, where 41 people died, and the Linwood Islamic Center, where seven died. One person died in the hospital.

More than 20 people were seriously wounded in the racist rampage.

One person, a self-proclaimed racist who described himself as a 28-year-old Australian, was arrested and charged with murder and two others were detained in what Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern called “one of New Zealand’s darkest days.”

The Australian suspect, who claimed responsibility for the shootings, left a 74-page manifesto against immigrants and used a helmet-mounted camera to capture footage of the killings.

Contributing: Doug Stanglin and Joel Shannon

Article source: http://rssfeeds.usatoday.com/~/599637356/0/usatodaycomwashington-topstories~aposI-tried-to-hold-back-tearsapos-First-two-Muslim-congresswomen-react-to-New-Zealand-tragedy/

Loading...

Best Wordpress Plugin development company in India     Best Web development company in India

Related posts

Trump forms task force to study Postal Service operations, finances

Times of News

President Trump demands North Korea's Kim Jong Un live up to denuclearization agreement

Times of News

Sens. Kamala Harris and Rand Paul propose discouraging money bail for pretrial defendants

Times of News