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Americans support NASA but not a return to the moon, new poll shows

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India is looking to solidify its place among the world’s spacefaring nations with its second unmanned mission to the moon. (July 12)
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On Dec. 14, 1972, astronaut Gene Cernan stepped into the Apollo 17 Lunar Module to return to Earth. He was the last man to walk on the moon. If it were up to most Americans, it would stay that way.

A new Ipsos poll commissioned by C-SPAN for the 50th anniversary of the historic Apollo 11 moon landing shows that only 8% of Americans say a manned moon mission should be a top priority for NASA.

“Our general mentality as American people is: been there, done that, got the T-shirt, what are we doing that for?” said former NASA administrator and current Syracuse University professor Sean O’Keefe. 

“But what if Lewis and Clark had said, we’re going to go West one time and then we’re going to quit, because we’ve done that?”

Asteroids, research, robots: Americans don’t want a space program focused on moon

Orion:NASA to test spacecraft designed to carry humans back to the moon

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  • Brandon Collins shot this photo of his brother and1 of 84
  • The Super Blood Wolf Moon (and a few stars) shine over Brevard County Sunday evening and Monday morning2 of 84
  • The super blood wolf moon is seen over city center3 of 84
  • The super blood wolf moon seen in Le Mans northwestern France behind the statue named L'envol.4 of 84
  • June's full moon, known as the Strawberry Moon, rises above the Apollo Temple in ancient Corinth, on June 17, 2019.5 of 84
  • A waxing gibbous moon sets over the downtown Knoxville6 of 84
  • A U.S. Flag in downtown Washington flies in front of the moon during a lunar eclipse, Sunday, Jan. 20, 2019. The entire eclipse will exceed three hours. Totality - when the moon's completely bathed in Earth's shadow - will last an hour. Expect the eclipsed, or blood moon, to turn red from sunlight scattering off Earth's atmosphere. (AP Photo/J. David Ake)7 of 84
  • The moon is framed in a statue on the state Capitol during a total lunar eclipse Sunday, Jan. 20, 2019, in Sacramento, Calif. The entire eclipse will exceed three hours. Totality-when the moon's completely bathed in the Earth's shadow-will last an hour. Expect the eclipsed or blood moon, to turn red from the sunlight scattering off Earth's atmosphere. (AP Photo/Rich Pedroncelli)8 of 84
  • The eclipse begins as the Super Blood Moon sets over the J. Stanley Tunney Bridge over the Barnegat Bay in Toms River, NJ, Wednesday, January 31, 2018.9 of 84
  • Blood moon setting over Yonkers10 of 84
  • A blood moon rises next to the statue of Nike, the goddess of victory, during a complete lunar eclipse in Warsaw, Poland, July 27, 2018. 11 of 84
  • View of the full moon during the blood moon next to the ancient Greek goddess Irine holding a child symblolizing peace and justice in central Athens on July 27, 2018.The period of total eclipse, when earth's shadow is directly across the moon and it is at its reddest, lasted 1 hour, 42 minutes and 57 seconds, making it the longest viewable lunar eclipse of the century. 12 of 84
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  •  A Super Blue Blood Moon sets behind Downside Abbey,14 of 84
  • A super blue blood moon behind a mountain is seen from15 of 84
  • Super blue blood moon above The Statue of Liberty.16 of 84
  • The moon is behind the Historic Anderson County Courthouse17 of 84
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  • Reindeers are seen silhouetted against the blood moon19 of 84
  • Gov. George W.P. Hunt's tomb in Papago Park with the20 of 84
  • The blood moon rises over the casinos in Laughlin,21 of 84
  • A photographer was at the beach before dawn to photograph meteors from the Perseids meteor shower. The meteors were elusive, but the photographer looked behind him and realized there was a better photo  to the west - the super moon of August hanging in the  sky with the Club Zion steeple in the foreground.22 of 84
  • A super moon rises above the 'Maritime Prowess' by Albert Hemstock Hodge on the Guild Hall ahead of the Lunar Eclipse, in Hull, England, Sunday, Jan. 20, 2019.23 of 84
  • An airplane is silhouetted against the 'Super Moon' as it makes it's way to Sky Harbor Airport Sunday, June 23, 2013. 24 of 84
  • A view of the supermoon that announces the start of the spring over the Pico Sacro mountain from Santiago de Compostela, Galicia, Spain March 20, 2019.  25 of 84
  • A view of the supermoon that announces the start of the spring over the Santiago de Compostela cathedral, Galicia, Spain on March 20, 2019.26 of 84
  • A supermoon rises behind the Camlica Mosque in Istanbul, Turkey on Feb. 19,  2019. 27 of 84
  • The Statue of Freedom on top of the US Capitol dome is seen silhouetted against the super moon on January 20, 2019 in Washington, DC. (Photo by Brendan Smialowski / AFP)BRENDAN SMIALOWSKI/AFP/Getty Images28 of 84
  • SUPERMOON - Badrinath Uppalapati, left, and his girlfriend, Bhargavi Tadinada, both from Milwaukee, pause for a moment after checking out the super moon off the shores of Lake Michigan near Bradford Beach in Milwaukee, Wis. on Monday, January 1, 2018. Full moons on Jan. 1 and 31 will be followed by full moons on March 1 and March 31. The last time two blue moons happened in the same year was 1999.   - Photo by Mike De Sisti / Milwaukee Journal Sentinel ORG XMIT: MJS180101172340096729 of 84
  • Hunter's Super moon rises over Brooklyn as seen from Liberty State Park in Jersey City. Viewing was at its best on Sunday, when the moon is both full and at its closest point to our planet as it orbits Earth. October 16, 2016, Jersey City, NJ.30 of 84
  • A Wolf Moon rises over downtown Des Moines, Iowa, Monday evening, Jan. 1, 2018. Also known as a super moon. The moon is distorted by the layers of atmosphere the photo is shot through when so close to the horizon.31 of 84
  • The super moon rises behind a thoroughbred at Sun Valley Farms in Versailles, Kentucky.January 29, 201832 of 84
  • The Supermoon rises behind the Barnegat Lighthouse33 of 84
  • The super blue blood moon seen from Sleepy Hollow Jan 31, 2018.34 of 84
  • The lunar eclipse of the super moon in the sky over Brewster Jan. 31, 2018.35 of 84
  • On the morning of the 2018 Super Moon, a Manhattan36 of 84
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  • The first Super Moon of 2018 sets over Southern Indiana38 of 84
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  • The Super Moon glows orange behind some purple lights.41 of 84
  • The super moon rises above the lighthouse of San Maurizio42 of 84
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  • A glowing supermoon sets over West Memphis. It is the44 of 84
  • The super moon captured through a canopy of fall leaves.45 of 84
  • The moon sets over the Gulf Coast on Monday morning,46 of 84
  • The moon rises over Mantanzas Pass on Fort Myers Beach47 of 84
  • A horse on a weathervane atop  Clocktower Commons on48 of 84
  • Hunter's Super moon rises over Brooklyn as seen from49 of 84
  • the super moon rises over Brant Lake Sunday, Nov. 13,50 of 84
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  • Super moon photographed by Gail Markham.  54 of 84
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  • Victory tops the Soldiers and Sailors Civil War65 of 84
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  • The super blood wolf moon is seen over the Church of Saint Nicholas in Prague, Czech Republic.69 of 84
  • A lunar eclipse progresses behind a Russian national flag in St. Petersburg, Russia, Monday, Jan. 21, 2019. The moon experiences an eclipse when the earth moves directly between the sun and the moon. (AP Photo/Dmitri Lovetsky)70 of 84
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  • The second Blue Moon of the year rises behind a car72 of 84
  • The second Blue Moon of the year rises behind a car73 of 84
  • This blue moon rises over a barn in Waukesha County74 of 84
  • A rare lunar trifecta, a Supermoon, Blue moon and a75 of 84
  • With Earth in the background, the Lunar Module ascent stage with Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin approaches a rendezvous with the Apollo Command Module.76 of 84
  • Astronaut Buzz Aldrin walks on the surface of the moon near the leg of the lunar module Eagle during the Apollo 11 mission. Mission commander Neil Armstrong took this photograph with a 70mm lunar surface camera.77 of 84
  • On July 20, 1969, astronaut Buzz Aldrin, lunar module78 of 84
  • Earthrise is viewed from the Apollo 11 mission's lunar landing module 'Eagle' prior to its landing on July 20, 1969. 79 of 84
  • This is astronaut Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin's boot and footprint in lunar soil July 20,1969. 80 of 84
  • This is astronaut Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin's boot and footprint in lunar soil July 20,1969. 81 of 84
  • Astronaut Buzz Aldrin stands besides a lunar seismometer looking back toward the lunar landing module in this photo taken by 'Apollo 11' commander and first Man on the Moon, Neil Armstrong, on July 20, 1969. 82 of 84
  • This is Crater 308 on the moon viewed from orbit on July 20, 1969. 83 of 84
  • Neil Armstrong works near the lunar landing module in this photo taken by 'Eagle' lander pilot Edwin Aldrin on  July 20, 1969. 84 of 84

One astronomer wants to find out

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“I think when people think about what these lunar missions will do, the fact that we will inspire the next generation of engineers, and scientists and medical doctors, the kind of technology that we have to invent and how that feeds back in the economy and makes our country stronger,” said Mark Kirasich, Program Manager of Orion, the NASA capsule being built to send humans to the moon.

“I think these things really add up to something that’s really important that people will appreciate if not today, as we get into it,” he said. 

This isn’t the first time public sentiment doesn’t mesh with space policy. Support for a manned moon mission wasn’t very high during the Apollo era either. A 1965 Gallop poll found that only 39% of Americans thought the U.S. should do everything possible, regardless of cost, to be the first nation on the moon.

According to previous studies, the American public has a history of recognizing the value of space missions after the fact. It wasn’t until 30 years after Apollo 11, in 1999, that 55% of the public felt the benefits of space exploration outweighed the billions in cost.

‘Alexa, take me to the moon’: Jeff Bezos wants to take astronauts to the moon

That number has decreased. The new Ipsos poll found that 31% of Americans feel the benefits of space exploration exceed the cost. Another 41% say the benefits and the costs are about equal.

NASA is moving ahead with its moon mission, dubbed Artemis after the twin sister of Apollo. Its goal is to send the first woman and the next man to the moon by 2024.

One thing Americans today have in common with the Apollo era public is a desire for the U.S. to be first or to stay in the lead. When the question of lunar missions is framed as a competition with other countries, support for a moon mission is much higher.

Forty-nine percent of Americans feel “the United States should re-start their Moon explorations missions to catch-up to countries like China and Israel.”

“If China shows up on the moon kind of by surprise and says it’s now a Chinese moon not a U.S. moon, then I think our competitive juices would get engaged,” Logsdon said.

When it comes to comparing NASA to commercial space companies, NASA is overwhelmingly the favorite. Seventy-eight percent of Americans have a favorable view of NASA while only 27% think space exploration should be taken over by private businesses.

This may have to do with their desire to keep space “wild,” as 52% believe most of the solar system should be preserved as official wilderness similar to national parks to limit mining of moons, asteroids or planets, all of which are stated goals of several private space companies.

As for space tourism, only 31% of Americans would travel to space if given the opportunity.

Space tourism?: The truth about NASA’s plan to ‘privatize’ the space station

Follow Rachael Joy on Twitter @Rachael_Joy.

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  • 'Apollo 11' astronaut Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin stands by the American flag planted on the surface of the moon on July 20, 1969. Apollo 11 landed Commander Neil Armstrong made this photo.1 of 50
  • Apollo 11 was launched by a Saturn V rocket from Kennedy Space Center on Merritt Island, Fla, on July 16, 1969.  The Saturn V is 363-feet tall,  60 feet taller than the Statue of Liberty. Fully fueled for liftoff, the Saturn V weighed 6.2 million pounds.2 of 50
  • The Apollo 11 Saturn V rocket blasts off on July 16, 1969.  At takeoff, the rocket generated 7.6 million pounds of thrust.3 of 50
  • Former President Lyndon B. Johnson and then-current Vice President Spiro Agnew are among the spectators at the launch of Apollo 11,  July 16, 1969. 4 of 50
  • This photograph shows the Saturn V launch vehicle (SA-506) for the Apollo 11 mission liftoff at 8:32 am CDT, July 16, 1969, from launch complex 39A at the Kennedy Space Center. Apollo 11 was the first manned lunar landing mission with a crew of three astronauts: Mission commander Neil A. Armstrong, Command Module pilot Michael Collins, and Lunar Module pilot Edwin E. Aldrin, Jr. It placed the first humans on the surface of the moon and returned them back to Earth. Astronaut Armstrong became the first man on the lunar surface, and astronaut Aldrin became the second. Astronaut Collins piloted the Command Module in a parking orbit around the Moon.5 of 50
  • Thousands of spectators camped out on beaches and roads to watch the launch of Apollo 11, which launched at 9:32 a.m. Eastern on July 16, 1969. 6 of 50
  • These are some of the thousands of people who camped out on beaches adjacent to the Kennedy Space Center in Fla. to watch the Apollo 11 mission liftoff aboard the Saturn V rocket, July 16, 1969.  7 of 50
  • The Launch Control Center during 'Saturn V' rocket launch carrying the 'Apollo 11' astronauts as it lifts off in Cape Canavarel on July 16, 1969. 8 of 50
  • Astronaut and Lunar Module pilot Buzz Aldrin during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity on the moon. He had just deployed the Early Apollo Scientific Experiments Package. In the foreground is the Passive Seismic Experiment Package; beyond it is the Laser Ranging Retro-Reflector (LR-3). 9 of 50
  • Apollo 11 astronaut Neil Armstrong, trudges across the surface of the moon leaving behind footprints, July 20, 1969. 10 of 50
  • Edwin Buzz Aldrin in the Apollo 11 Lunar Module, July 20, 1969. 11 of 50
  • New York City welcomes the Apollo 11 crew in a ticker tape parade down Broadway and Park Avenue. In the lead car are astronauts Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and Buzz Aldrin. The three astronauts teamed for the first manned lunar landing, on July 20, 1969.12 of 50
  • These are the flight controllers at the Space Center in Houston, as the 'Apollo 11' mission's lunar landing module descends to the surface of the moon on July 20, 1969.13 of 50
  • Astronaut Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin walking on the moon in this iconic image taken by 'Apollo 11' commander and First Man on the Moon, Neil Armstrong, on  July 20, 1969. 14 of 50
  • Astronaut Neil A. Armstrong was born in Wapakoneta, Ohio on Aug. 5, 1930 and passed away at age 82 on Aug. 25, 2012. Armstrong made history on July 20, 1969, when he became the first person to walk on the moon as commander of Apollo 11. This photograph of Armstrong from the Apollo 11 mission was taken inside the Lunar Module while the LM rested on the lunar surface. Astronauts Armstrong and Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, had already completed their historic spacewalk when this picture was made. Astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit while Armstrong and Aldrin explored the moon's surface.15 of 50
  • Earthrise is viewed from the Apollo 11 mission's lunar landing module 'Eagle' prior to its landing on July 20, 1969. 16 of 50
  • Astronaut Buzz Aldrin stands besides a lunar seismometer looking back toward the lunar landing module in this photo taken by 'Apollo 11' commander and first Man on the Moon, Neil Armstrong, on July 20, 1969. 17 of 50
  • Astronaut Edwin E. Aldrin Jr., lunar module pilot, descends the steps of the Lunar Module (LM) ladder as he prepares to walk on the moon, july 16, 1969.  This photograph was taken by astronaut Neil A. Armstrong, commander, with a 70mm lunar surface camera during the Apollo 11 extravehicular activity (EVA). While Armstrong and Aldrin descended in the LM Eagle to explore the moon, astronaut Michael Collins, command module pilot, remained with the Command and Service Modules (CSM) in lunar orbit. 18 of 50
  • This is Crater 308 on the moon viewed from orbit on July 20, 1969. 19 of 50
  • This is astronaut Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin's boot and footprint in lunar soil July 20,1969. 20 of 50
  • This photograph of the Lunar Module at Tranquility Base was taken by Neil Armstrong during the Apollo 11 mission, from the rim of Little West Crater on the lunar surface. This is the furthest distance from the lunar module traveled by either astronaut while on the moon.21 of 50
  • The Moon limb and 'Eagle' Lunar Module ascent to the moon, July 20,1969. 22 of 50
  • This is at Tranquility Base. 23 of 50
  • This is the Eagle lunar landing module in landing configuration in orbit taken by Michael Collins on  July 20, 1969. 24 of 50
  • Astronaut Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin deploys the Passive Seismic Experiment Package on the moon, July 20, 1969. 25 of 50
  • This is astronaut Edwin 'Buzz' Aldrin's boot and footprint in lunar soil July 20,1969. 26 of 50
  • This is the Eagle lunar landing module in landing configuration in orbit taken by Michael Collins on  July 20, 1969. 27 of 50
  • Neil Armstrong works near the lunar landing module in this photo taken by 'Eagle' lander pilot Edwin Aldrin on  July 20, 1969. 28 of 50
  • Members of the 'Apollo 11' crew wait for pickup by a helicopter from the 'USS Hornet',  July 24, 1969. 29 of 50
  • Navy Lieutenant Clancey Hatleberg disinfects Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins, and Buzz Aldrin in the life raft during recovery operations in the Pacific Ocean, July 24, 1969. 30 of 50
  • The Apollo 11 command module lands in the Pacific Ocean as the crew waits to be picked up by Navy personnel after an eight day mission to the moon, July 24, 1969. 31 of 50
  • Former President Richard M. Nixon welcomes the 'Apollo 11' astronauts, Neil Armstrong, Michael Collins and Edwin Aldrin confined in the Mobile Quarantine Facility aboard the 'USS Hornet',  July 24, 1969.32 of 50
  • Apollo 11 Astronauts Michael Collins, Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. and Neil A. Armstrong relax in the Mobile Quarantine Facility. 33 of 50
  • Apollo 11 astronauts Neil Armstrong, Mike Collins and Buzz Aldrin in a NASA photo used to promote the motion picture In the Shadow of the Moon. The photo shows the three men in quarantine after their trip to the moon. Armstrong and Aldrin were respectively the first and second men to walk on the lunar surface. 34 of 50
  • The Apollo 11 spacecraft Command Module (CM) is loaded aboard a Super Guppy Aircraft at Ellington Air Force Base for shipment to the North American Rockwell Corporation at Downey, Calif. The CM was just released from its postflight quarantine at the Manned Spacecraft Center (which would later be renamed JSC). 35 of 50
  • The crawler inches its way along the three-and-a-half-mile journey to Launch Pad 39A carrying the Apollo 11 Saturn V rocket. 36 of 50
  • Neil Armstrong, Apollo 11 mission commander, floats safely to the ground after the Lunar Landing Research Vehicle exploded seconds before while Armstrong was rehearsing a lunar landing at Ellington Air Force Base near the Manned Spacecraft Center. The photo is a blowup of a 16mm documentary motion picture. 37 of 50
  • The Instrument Instrument Unit For Saturn V is lowered In place. 38 of 50
  • This is the S-1C booster for the Apollo 11 Saturn V. 39 of 50
  • Apollo 11 astronauts stand next to their spacecraft in 1969 including Col. Edwin E. Aldrin, lunar module pilot; Neil Armstrong, flight commander; and Lt. Michael Collins, command module pilot.  40 of 50
  • Neil Armstrong trained for the Apollo 11 mission at NASA Langley's Lunar Landing Research Facility on equipment that cancelled all but one-sixth of Earth's gravitational force. Armstrong offered perhaps the greatest tribute to the importance of his training when asked what it was like to land on the moon, replying, Like Langley.41 of 50
  • Apollo 11 backup crew members Fred Haise (left) and Jim Lovell prepare to enter the Lunar Module for an altitude test. 42 of 50
  • Command Module pilot Michael Collins practices in the CM simulator on June 19, 1969, at Kennedy Space Center.43 of 50
  • The Apollo 11 lunar landing mission crew, Neil A. Armstrong, Michael Collins and  Edwin E. Aldrin Jr. July 16, 1969.44 of 50
  • Neil Armstrong's helmet and gloves from the Apollo 11 space mission at the Smithsonian's National Air and Space Museum Conservation Lab  Sept. 12, 2018. 45 of 50
  • This is a Hasselblad 70mm Camera from the command module that was carried on the Apollo 11 mission.  According to NASA, When John Glenn became the first American in orbit, bringing a camera was an afterthought. An Ansco Autoset 35mm camera, manufactured by Minolta, was purchased in a local drug store and hastily modified so the astronaut could use it more easily while in his pressure suit. A comprehensive set of camera equipment was carried on board Apollo 11. This included two 16mm Maurer motion picture film cameras, a color television camera in the orbiting Columbia, and a black and white TV camera outside of the lunar module to transmit to Earth Neil Armstrong's first steps on the Moon's surface. A Kodak stereo close-up camera was used to film the lunar soil from only inches away. Three Hasselblad 500EL cameras were carried. Two of the Hasselblad cameras were identical to those carried on the earlier Apollo 8 and 10 lunar orbit missions. During the Moon landing one Hasselblad was left aboard the Command Module Columbia, which remained in lunar orbit. Two were taken on the Lunar Module Eagle to the Moon's surface. 46 of 50
  • Neil Armstrong is awarded the Samuel P. Langely medal in front of the Apollo 11 Columbia Command Module during a ceremony on the 30th anniversary of the moon landing as Vice President Al Gore applauds, July 20 1999 at the National Air and Space Museum. 47 of 50
  • This is Neil Armstrong's A6L Apollo 11 space suit glove displayed as part of Julien's Auctions Treasures from the Vault media preview in Los Angeles. Nov. 13, 2017. 48 of 50
  • Te crew of Apollo 11,  Michael Collins, Neil Armstrong and Buzz Aldrin stand in front of the Apollo command module Columbia after being awarded the Samuel P. Langley medal July, 20, 1999 at the National Air and Space Museum in Washington, DC.49 of 50
  • Apollo 11 Astronauts Edwin Aldrin Michael Collins and Neil Armstrong get a close view of one of the moon rocks carried back by the crew from the surface of the moon, Sept. 16, 1969 in Washington. The two-pound, fist-sized grey rock was turned over to the Smithsonian Institution in Washington and will be put on public display.50 of 50

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