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Almost 2 million Californians will be without power through Thursday in shutdown to reduce wildfire risk

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Pacific Gas and Electric Co. is shutting off power to hundreds of thousands of homes and businesses amid dry conditions in an effort to prevent fires.
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REDDING, Calif. – Almost 2 million Californians will be left in the dark at least through Thursday as the state’s largest utility implements a preemptive power shutdown in an aggressive effort to curb wildfire risks amid high winds and hot, dry conditions.

Pacific Gas and Electric spokesman Mark Mesesan said Wednesday that it may take days to restore electricity to some customers because power lines and equipment must be checked before being reenergized. The strong winds, some as high as 70 mph, are expected to abate by Thursday afternoon.

Residents in areas where power was going out lined up at gas stations and streamed into stores in pursuit of generators, flashlights, batteries and nonperishable food. The outage also prompted schools and universities to cancel classes and some businesses to close.

‘A victim of their own failure’: Why PGE’s massive power shutdown in California was inevitable

The first phase of the Public Safety Power Shutoff cut out electric service to 513,000 homes and businesses — or more than 1 million people — starting early Wednesday morning and affected mostly Northern California.

The second phase was initially scheduled to start at noon and stretch to parts of cities as large as San Jose and Santa Cruz, impacting more than half a million people, but it was delayed. It’s expected to be implemented around 8 p.m. Pacific Time.

PGE said an additional 42,000 subscribers in the southernmost areas it covers could go also dark. Every customer account represents between two and three people.

Nearly all nine counties in the San Francisco Bay Area were subject to the shutdowns, the only exception being the city and county of San Francisco.

PGE is trying to prevent downed power lines or vegetation contact with its equipment from sparking fires. Some of California’s most destructive blazes in recent years were started by the utility’s power lines. 

Parts of Southern California could also lose electricity. Southern California Edison said it was considering implementing the shutoff plan to cut power to 173,000 customers. San Diego Gas Electric said 30,000 of its customers were put on similar alert.

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  • The lantern section is nearly empty at an ACE Hardware store as shoppers prepare for possible power shutoffs in Los Gatos, Calif., Oct. 8, 2019.1 of 20
  • Garfield Elementary School student Terreece Douresseau attempts to enter the front door of the school only to learn the school has been closed due to a possible power outage by Pacific Gas  Electric on Oct. 9, 2019, in San Leandro, Calif.2 of 20
  • James Cooke is shown buying water bottles along with propane tanks and batteries at a ACE Hardware store as he prepares for a possible power shutdown in Los Gatos, Calif., on Oct. 8, 2019. Millions of people were poised to lose electricity throughout northern and central California after Pacific Gas  Electric Co. announced Tuesday it would shut off power in the largest preventive outage in state history to try to avert wildfires caused by faulty lines.3 of 20
  • A view of power lines near homes in Oakland, Calif. on Oct. 8, 2019. The Pacific Gas  Electric (PGE) utilities company has confirmed that around 800,00 customers across 34 Northern California counties would be left without power starting at midnight as a precaution due to dry conditions and high wildfire risk. It will be California's largest power outage in history.4 of 20
  • Joe Wilson pulls his generator out in the garage of his home, which is in an area that is expected to lose power early Wednesday, in the East Foothills area of San Jose, Calif., Oct. 8, 2019.5 of 20
  • A view of the Pacific Gas  Electric (PGE) substation in Oakland, Calif. on OCt. 8, 2019.6 of 20
  • A view of power lines in the hills of Oakland, Oct. 8, 2019.7 of 20
  • In this Nov. 26, 2018, file photo, a Pacific Gas  Electric lineman works to repair a power line in fire-ravaged Paradise, Calif. The utility says power could be shut off in 30 counties in central and Northern California starting Wednesday, Oct. 9, when hot weather and strong winds are forecast, and through Thursday.8 of 20
  • In this Jan. 14, 2019, file photo, Pacific Gas  Electric vehicles are parked at the PGE Oakland Service Center in Oakland, Calif.9 of 20
  • Cars line up to get gas at a Costco gas station on Oct. 9, 2019, in Vallejo, Calif. 10 of 20
  • Vehicles back up on Highway 12 as traffic signals remain dark during a power outage on Oct. 9, 2019, in Boyes Hot Springs, Calif. 11 of 20
  • Armando Espinoza delivers paper products to a cafe in downtown Sonoma, Calif., where power is turned off, on Wednesday, Oct. 9, 2019. Pacific Gas  Electric has cut power to more than half a million customers in Northern California hoping to prevent wildfires during dry, windy weather throughout the region.12 of 20
  • Joseph Pokorski drinks a beer at The Town Square as downtown Sonoma, Calif., remains without power on Oct. 9, 2019. 13 of 20
  • Lit by battery-powered lights, a worker waits for customers at Basque Boulangerie Cafe as downtown Sonoma, Calif., remains without power on Oct. 9, 2019. 14 of 20
  • Daniel Almanza of Bayside Cafe, which was among businesses to lose power due to PGE's public safety power shutoff, calls a supplier from the office of the restaurant in Sausalito, Calif., on Oct. 9, 2019. 15 of 20
  • Shift supervisor James Quinn walks through a darkened CVS Pharmacy as downtown Sonoma, Calif., remains without power on on Oct. 9, 2019.16 of 20
  • Tom Hyde, left, buys a can of fuel for his Coleman camp stove from Kim Scheffer at a Village True Value Hardware store in Santa Rosa, Calif., on Oct. 9, 2019. 17 of 20
  • Daniel Ibarra, right, hands a manually written receipt to customer Mark Costales, who paid for lunch in cash, at Murphy's Irish Pub  Restaurant, in Sonoma, Calfi., on Oct. 9, 2019.18 of 20
  • CVS Pharmacy shift supervisor James Quinn throws out ice cream from darkened freezers as downtown Sonoma, Calif., remains without power on Oct. 9, 2019. 19 of 20
  • Customers shop at BC Ace Hardware in the Glenbrook Basin where a generator is keeping the lights lit on Oct. 9, 2019 in Grass Valley, Calif. 20 of 20

outages had some of those residents grumbling, many about food they fear will go bad.

“We just bought a whole bunch of groceries, and now we have to dump it,” said Annie McNally of Jones Valley, California. “I am so fed up with these power outages.”

Some had even bigger concerns. 

Lisa Round of Anderson said she has sleep apnea and needs to wear a mask to bed, and her mother requires oxygen from a tank at night.

With the likelihood of losing electricity for her mask overnight Tuesday for Wednesday, “I actually plugged it into my car. I ran my car so that I wouldn’t die in my sleep.”

The blackout warning system hasn’t played well. The company’s website has struggled with the heavy traffic, preventing or delaying some subscribers from finding information about the blackouts.

“We understand our customers are frustrated with the website not working. That’s something we’re working very hard to fix,” spokesman Jeff Smith said. “We’ve tried to mitigate that a little by putting the maps and things that are available out on our social media accounts, so that’s an alternative for folks. We apologize for the problem.”

The University of California-Berkeley and California State University-East Bay were among colleges forced to close their doors. Schools were shuttered for tens of thousands of elementary and high school students as municipalities braced for days without power.

Class-action lawsuit:California wildfire was caused by Pacific Gas Electric

Lewis said PGE anticipates the wind “weather event” will last through midday Thursday; peak winds are forecast to reach 60-70 mph at higher elevations.

PGE opened resource centers with charging stations and restrooms available to the public during daylight hours.

“They’re places where affected customers can come in to charge electronic devices, obtain bottled water and use available restrooms,” Mesesan said. “It’s more of an in-and-out option. They’re not equipped as a place to stay.”

PGE has been under intense scrutiny since November, when the deadliest and most devastating wildfire in state history roared through Butte County. California fire officials determined the blaze, which killed 85 people and destroyed more than 10,000 homes, was ignited by the company’s transmission lines.

The beleaguered utility filed for bankruptcy this year, and a new CEO tried to restructure the company and win back customer confidence.

The state is bracing for another severe wildfire season, although that season has become just about year-round. PGE ordered a much smaller power cutoff in June involving thousands of customers in the Northern California counties of Napa, Solano and Yolo.

Read this: In Paradise, wildfire victims rush to meet deadline for claims against PGE

Tuesday, Cal Fire issued a fire warning across much of the state.

“There is a #RedFlagWarning for most of Northern California and #FireWeatherWatch for the southernmost region of California from Wednesday morning to Thursday evening due to gusty winds and low humidity,” Cal Fire warned on Twitter. “This is #CriticalFireWeather and caution should be taken when outdoors.”

Bacon reported from McLean, Virginia. Contributing: Kristin Lam and Marco Della Cava, USA TODAY; David Benda, Matt Brannon and Alayna Shulman, Redding Record SearchlightGabrielle Paluch, Palm Springs Desert Sun

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