Share

‘Time may fade, but our memories cannot’: Canadians honour soldiers on Remembrance Day

Everyone from everyday Canadians to dignitaries will attend Remembrance Day events today in Ottawa and across Canada to honour those who lost their lives while serving their country.

The most prominent event is in Ottawa, where Gov. Gen David Johnston and Prime Minister Justin Trudeau were among those who attended a special service at the National War Memorial.

A huge crowd, veterans, serving military members and a throng of civilians stood quietly in gusty winds and a temperature of 3 degrees C under grey skies.

Traditionally, tens of thousands of people gather around the memorial on Nov. 11.

Cannon fire echoed in the distance behind Gov. Gen. David Johnston and his wife, Sharon Johnston, both wearing military uniforms — he in the blue of the air force as commander-in-chief and she as a honorary navy captain.Trudeau and other dignitaries were also on hand and placed wreaths.

Remembrance Day 20161111

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau lays a wreath as Sophie Grégoire Trudeau looks on as they take part in the National Remembrance Day Ceremony at the National War Memorial in Ottawa on Friday. (Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)

In a statement, the prime minister urged Canadians to reflect on the sacrifices of those who died.

“Time may fade, but our memories cannot. We all have a duty to hold the torch high, and to keep its flame alight. Liberty’s cause beats deeply within our hearts, and every generation of Canadians has answered the call to serve,” said Trudeau.

A British Columbia woman who lost a son during the conflict in Afghanistan was been picked as this year’s Silver Cross Mother.

Colleen Fitzpatrick placed a wreath at the National War Memorial on behalf of all Canadian mothers with a child in the military who died in the line of duty.

Remembrance Day 20161111

Colleen Fitzpatrick place a wreath at the National War Memorial on behalf of all Canadian mothers with a child in the military who died in the line of duty. Her son, Cpl. Darren Fitzpatrick, died in Afghanistan in 2010 when he stepped on an explosive device. (Adrian Wyld/Canadian Press)

Her son, Cpl. Darren Fitzpatrick, died in Afghanistan in 2010 when he stepped on an explosive device.

In all, some 1,400 communities will hold ceremonies remembering those who served the country.

Remembrance Day 20161111

Canadian veteran Fred Morton, 91, a former signalman during the Second World War salutes during Remembrance Day ceremonies at the cenotaph Friday, November 11, 2016 in Montreal. (Ryan Remiorz/Canadian Press)

remembrance day graphic

(CBC)